sensors/microphones for extracting data from city soundscape

Hi,

I need to extract data from city noises and will process them realtime in software PureData (making sound art/music). I will likely use nano or uno.

A microphone will be the foundation but I think that data for vibrations and wind speed would be useful too.

What microphone and sensors would be suitable for a project like this?

Sorry if it is a blurry question but I need to start somewhere. :slight_smile:

Cheers

Are you sure that PureData will even run on an Arduino?

I will likely use nano or uno.

You should definitely experiment, but with such tiny computers, you will find that audio quality and quantity is extremely limited, and may be useless for an art/music project. Arduino microphone modules suitable for experimentation require an amplifier and are readily available. One example.

Pure Data runs on modern PCs.

I've never heard of PureData but if you're going to use a computer there's no need for an Arduino.

You might want to check YouTube for "Arduino Lighting Effects" or "Arduino Spectrum Analyzer" to get an idea of what people are doing and what can be done. Or just to get started, take a look at my [u]World's Simplest Lighting Effect.[/u]. It works with a line-level audio signal or with a microphone board. (I tried it with the SparkFun microphone board and the sound has to be on the "loud side", slightly louder than I normally listen to the TV, and that particular board doesn't have a gain/sensitivity control.)

Of course, you're not limited to LEDs & lighting.

I've never heard of PureData but if you're going to use a computer there's no need for an Arduino.

It is a graphical programming language that you code by moving blocks about and linking them together with virtual wires. It is the freeware version of another language called Max.

You can’t run it on the Arduino. I suspect the OP wants to send audio data to a PC using serial.
However what he wants to do is not possible, because he hasn’t thought it out. The amount of signal processing you can do is limited and it will not be possible to recognise sounds and have them trigger other things.

You can run Pure Data on a Raspberry Pi and it even has extensions that allow PD to access it’s GPIO pins. But the none real-time nature of basic means that there is little that will work with an audio input.

brodbord:
I will likely use nano or uno.

What part would an Uno/Nano be playing in this project? Remember that the PC running PureData will probably have at least 4 x 32-bit cores running at 2GHz, 8~16GB of ram and Terabytes of disk space. An Uno has one 16MHz 8-bit core, 2KB ram and 32KB of storage.

jremington:
You should definitely experiment, but with such tiny computers, you will find that audio quality and quantity is extremely limited, and may be useless for an art/music project. Arduino microphone modules suitable for experimentation require an amplifier and are readily available. One example.

Pure Data runs on modern PCs.

Sorry all, I should have stated that I will use the Ardunio as an interface (with standard firmata) when programming in Pd on my mac, and once I am done use a raspberry pi instead of the mac.

There is even a subforum here for Arduino combined with Pd and other software:

Interfacing w/ Software on the Computer -
Firmata, Processing, Max/MSP, PureData, VVVV, etc.

The final audio output is going to be done through synthesis in Pd. I will use a microphone for sound analysis (and yes, probably better to just an audio interface), but what about sensors for vibration, and wind speed?

I should have stated that I will use the Ardunio as an interface (with standard firmata) when programming in Pd on my mac,

Standard Firmata can not cope with audio data.

The vibration sensors you can get are only useful for detecting things like washing machine size vibrations. Wind sensors are normally done with rotating cups and an opto detector. There are plenty of whether station projects on line. The problem as I see it is there is not much variation in wind speed throughout any hours performance.

Grumpy_Mike:
Standard Firmata can not cope with audio data.

Yes, did not mean audio interface, but an interface for getting sensor data into the computer.

The vibration sensors you can get are only useful for detecting things like washing machine size vibrations.

Alright, then I assume that traffic rumble is best detected by a microphone.

The problem as I see it is there is not much variation in wind speed throughout any hours performance.

The installation would be active for three months. But I am thinking that an exposed microphone could be useful for gettings some "wind-data".

The conclusion is that I probably do not need an Arduino for this project. :slight_smile: Thanks!

The conclusion is that I probably do not need an Arduino for this project.

Correct. Glad we could point you in the right direction.