Serial for LED Driver

So, I've wanted to create a generic topic here for any LED driver that may have a serial input. I've seen some specific libraries which is great, but I've been hard pressed to find the more generic "how-to" for proper understanding. So some questions I have is, does the Arduino (Uno) have a specific serial output method? Is PWM used for a serial output? How do you properly set the timing for the clock rise with the serial (pwm?) signal? How do you properly set the latch after your data has been sent?

Thanks everyone for participating and helping layout the basics. Maybe this could end up as a sticky.

does the Arduino (Uno) have a specific serial output method?

Yes it is the Serial module, Serial.print and Serial.write are the two most used output methods. But I don't think you mean this.

Is PWM used for a serial output?

No. http://www.thebox.myzen.co.uk/Tutorial/PWM.html

How do you properly set the timing for the clock rise with the serial (pwm?) signal?

There are two types of serial, synchronous and asynchronous. The other name for synchronous is SPI, that has a separate clock output. http://arduino.cc/en/Reference/SPI

How do you properly set the latch after your data has been sent?

What latch?

Maybe this could end up as a sticky.

No. It is all very specific to the hardware you are trying to control.

What latch?

Correct me if I'm wrong, but all serial inputs for LED Drivers require a clocked latched. First latch to open up registers to be written to and a second to lock it in. From TI's datasheet on 5941 "The rising edge of SCLK signal shifts the data from the SIN pin to the internal register. After all data is clocked in, a high-level pulse of XLAT signal latches the serial data to the internal registers. The internal registers are level-triggered latches of XLAT signal."

Correct me if I'm wrong, but all serial inputs for LED Drivers require a clocked latched.

Consider yourself corrected. Not all serial devices need a latch. Those that do you simply set the output pin to the appropriate level at the appropriate time.

From TI's datasheet on 5941 ......

Yes that is that chip but for example the WS801 does not need a latch signal. As I said each chip has its own requirements. There is not a "proper" way of doing anything. There are more / less efficient ways of doing things but no official proper way. This is hardware you know.

Consider yourself corrected. Not all serial devices need a latch.

Ha yeah, that was my bad, it was suppose to be a question not a statement. Well it's good to know that I know little, but at least I'm learning and thanks guys for the pointers and corrections.