Servo power

Hello,

This my first arduino project, and im using a 9G Micro Servo, i was wondering can the arduino handle the voltage on it's own or do i need to buy something else?

Not a good idea to power a servo from Arduino's 5V pin, you might get away with one very small servo, but it's risky, best to use a separate 5 or 6V supply or 4 AA batteries in series. There are many different servos called "9G", can you post a link to yours?

The Arduino can "handle" the voltage but it cannot provide any power.

You need a 5 V (or 6 V if only powering the servo) supply capable of at least one Amp to power the servo. If it is a reasonably well regulated supply of 5 V, then that supply can also power the Arduino via the "5V" pin.

outsider:
Not a good idea to power a servo from Arduino's 5V pin, you might get away with one very small servo

You might, presuming you are powering the Arduino via the USB connection.

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Its never a good idea to share power between logic circuitry and heavy loads like motors and servos.
Most people who try it find out the hard way. Motors and servos can crowbar the supply or push
voltage spikes onto it, neither is healthy for logic chips.

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outsider:
Not a good idea to power a servo from Arduino's 5V pin, you might get away with one very small servo, but it's risky, best to use a separate 5 or 6V supply or 4 AA batteries in series. There are many different servos called "9G", can you post a link to yours?

Thanks for your reply , here's a link to the servo : https://egypt.souq.com/eg-en/towerpro-sg90-9g-micro-servo-motor-arduino-raspberry-pi-avr-ar-m-pic-8425234/i/

Paul__B:
The Arduino can "handle" the voltage but it cannot provide any power.

, presuming you are powering the Arduino via the USB connection.

Yes, I'm going to run it via usb

Many of the servo tutorials do show the servo powered from the 5v pin of the Arduino.
And often, you can get away with this.

If you use any servo larger than yours, you increase the risk of a failure.
If you use multiple servos, you increase the risk of failure.
If you place any load on the servo by attaching anything to the arm or otherwise making the servo do more than simple moving the output arm through the air, you greatly increase the risk of failure.

The failure might be the voltage regulator overheating and shutting down. Or it might be the voltage regulator or other component failing catastrophically and causing you to purchase an entire new arduino.

A single, small, unloaded servo will probably not cause failure.

In my work with servos, I provide the servos with their own power supply. Don't forget to use a common ground.

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Can you please clarify what do you mean with "common ground"

vinceherman:
The failure might be the voltage regulator overheating and shutting down. Or it might be the voltage regulator or other component failing catastrophically and causing you to purchase an entire new arduino.

Not to mention blowing up the USB port one can only hope that it has a high current protection, but damage to an internal soundcard (welcome the buzzz) is also most definitely possible. Don't power servos (or anything that can cause spikes) via a USB-port.

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Fastora:
Can you please clarify what do you mean with "common ground"

servo.png

Deva_Rishi:
Not to mention blowing up the USB port one can only hope that it has a high current protection, but damage to an internal soundcard (welcome the buzzz) is also most definitely possible. Don't power servos (or anything that can cause spikes) via a USB-port.

OK thanks,
but can you tell what should I use instead to power the servo?

vinceherman:
servo.png

Can you please check this schematic from circuit.io and tell me if it's safe ?
https://www.circuito.io/app?components=9088,11021,11372,12083,2345678

looks relatively safe, i am no specialist on servos, but the data-pin of the arduino probably should be protected against high current, try it first with a 1k resistor in between the arduino and the servo.

Some context: hobby servos are designed to work from what are termed "receiver battery packs",
being 4.8V, 6V or 7.2V rechargable packs used in RC craft, usually a set of high current NiMH or LiFePO4
cells able to handle several amps. Historically these were 4, 5, 6 NiCd 1.2V cells, hence the nominal
voltages involved. These days 2S LiFePO4 packs are fairly common as they have the right sort of
voltage (6.6V) and survive a larger number of charge/discharge cycles compared to LiPo, and are much
less likely to burst into flames.

Typical small hobby servos draw upto about 1A peak, so whatever supply you use needs to handle at
least 1A per servo. Any lack of power will cause the servo(s) to misbehave, and this is the usual
problem people report on this forum (perhaps 90 to 95% of servo related issues are people not providing
adequate power to servos)

Thanks for all your replies, after reading your comments i think the best solution for me is to power the servo from an external power source that is 4 AA batteries .