servo sg90 with 12v

Can anyone tell me how to run a servo sg90 (max intake capacity 5v) by using a 12v d.c adapter.

And if it is a complicated process please suggest a simple way to power it externally.
Thanx!!

Get a 5V Dc-DC converter and run the servo from that. Or get 4 x AA rechargeable batteries. Or get a 5V power pack as used for recharging phones. Probably many other possibilities.

Steve

Thanx bro :slight_smile:

"Can anyone tell me how to run a servo sg90 (max intake capacity 5v) by using a 12v d.c adapter."

Are you sure the max voltage is 5v instead of 6v? Most hobby servos have a max voltage input of 6v, at which they operate the best. That being said, you can use a 5v 7805 regulator chip if needed.

zoomkat:
Are you sure the max voltage is 5v instead of 6v? Most hobby servos have a max voltage input of 6v, at which they operate the best.

Some research I did earlier in response to this - but decided not to mention it then - shows that the Tower Pro site itself specifies "Operating voltage: 4.8v" as do many other sites while others give it as a range from 4.8 to 6 V. And larger servos are definitely specified to 6 V.

4.8 V is of course, the general voltage of four Ni-MH cells though it could be as high as 6 V when freshly charged and it is equally appropriate to power servos from four Alkaline AA cells at 6 V - or 6.5 V when new.

I run the SG90 in a couple of projects reliably with 3.3V, which happens to be the nominal charge of a LIPO cell.

SteveMann:
I run the SG90 in a couple of projects reliably with 3.3V, which happens to be the nominal charge of a LIPO cell.

The nominal voltage of a Lipo is 3.7V, 4.2V fully charged. I've run SG90s on that.

Steve

Operating a servo off 4.8v is kind of like living off of wet dog and cat food, like, isn't there a better way? :wink:

zoomkat:
Operating a servo off 4.8v is kind of like living off of wet dog and cat food, like, isn’t there a better way? :wink:

Operating electronic/electromechanical devices at their specified voltage always struck me as quite a reasonable idea. What’s your problem with it?

Steve

"

slipstick:
Operating electronic/electromechanical devices at their specified voltage always struck me as quite a reasonable idea. What's your problem with it?

Steve

It has just been my experience that typical hobby servos develop more torque and move quicker at the high end of their specified voltage range. If a servo is specified to operate only at 4.8v, then it probably should be operated at 4.8v. If it meets the needs, then no harm, no foul. Personally i don't consider cat food and sushi to be the same. YMMV

zoomkat:
Personally i don’t consider cat food and sushi to be the same.

I’m not sure your cat would spot much difference;).

OTOH I have no real idea what your eccentric examples are intended to convey.

Steve

joydey:
Can anyone tell me how to run a servo sg90 (max intake capacity 5v) by using a 12v d.c adapter.

And if it is a complicated process please suggest a simple way to power it externally.
Thanx!!

Unless you need the torque, I'd suggest replacing that 12V adapter with a 5V one. This because now you can use the same adapter to power your Arduino as well, just connect it to the 5V pin - and do add a large capacitor, 100-470µF, across the power leads to the servo. This to stabilise the voltage.

slipstick:
The nominal voltage of a Lipo is 3.7V, 4.2V fully charged. I've run SG90s on that.

I've successfully ran them off 2xLiPo, 8.4V nominal. Out of spec, I know, but they run well :slight_smile:

As long as the electronics don't fry (obviously that part can handle the higher voltage), it'll be extended stall (or high load) that's gonna kill them at that voltage. Mine just had to rotate an HC-SR04 which is not that hard a job.

wvmarle:
Mine just had to rotate an HC-SR04 which is not that hard a job.

May be a problem if the cat starts to play with it when it runs out of sushi! :roll_eyes:

LOL good thing we don't have a cat and I don't really like sushi :slight_smile: