Share tips you have come across

LarryD: If you don’t have access to a CNC machine, you can make reasonable rectangular holes by hand. Tools you will need:

Let me introduce you to Nibbler...

|500x312

Wait. Not that Nibbler. This nibbler... https://www.google.com/search?q=nibbler+hand+tool

ChrisTenone:
A white pencil from any colored pencil set marks programmable chips so you can tell which one is which.

Some cheap finger nail polish also works for marking chips. (Some does not adhere.)

LarryD: Note: if you have a flush cut bit and router, you can avoid all but the corner filing at the last image in post 185.

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If you have one of these https://www.transtools.co.uk/accessories/router-cutters/base-plates-and-guide-bushes/silverline-guide-bush-set-10-piece

and use the smallest one it makes the corner radius much smaller and easier to file.

Yes, the nibbler is great for this kind of stuff too.
I use mine mainly for holes in aluminum and FR4 material.
It’s getting old but still works well.
I took off the top screw and spring for more accessibility.

For plastics, I stick with the above method CNC :wink:

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You can also label your I.C.s with ‘Post-it 658’ tape, cut to size.
It is: self adhesive, writable and easily removable (same glue as on Posit-Notes).

Here

PostIt.jpg

Boardburner2:
If you have one of these
https://www.transtools.co.uk/accessories/router-cutters/base-plates-and-guide-bushes/silverline-guide-bush-set-10-piece

and use the smallest one it makes the corner radius much smaller and easier to file.

I have one of those sets, but I have never used it :confused:

I was thinking of something like this, no filing except in the corners:

2017-02-21_8-58-59.jpg

These were shown on other threads, posted here for reference.
Print the attached PDFs on gum labels and stick to surface.

UNO:
2017-02-21_9-14-51.jpg

Bobuino:

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1 to 1.pdf (515 KB)

Atmega 1284 Label.pdf (174 KB)

ghfimage1 (6).JPG

Using a template with different collars allows the same template to be multipurpose.

That particular one can do 2 sizes of LED display and ventillation holes

What is the material you are using Larry.

It appears to be laminate mounted on some type of wood.

It is laminate flooring. (I wouldn’t use it on the floor though)

The core is hardboard.
They are 4 feet by 8 inches @ 1/4" thick, tongue & groove.
I think there are 12 pieces in a box.
Both the top and bottom have a hard coating that double stick (double sided) tape adheres to as if it were put on glass.

I bought a box just to make templates.
After they are put through a jointer, cut them into one inch 4 foot long strips (mark the jointed edge).
Use the strips as outlines for openings or to make templates like you showed.
It takes and keeps a great edge.

Template.jpg

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Further to post 186.

If the edges need to be fine tuned use a less aggressive glass finger nail file to do so.

FingerNail.jpg

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Chris?

I think he lives in Phoenix AZ.

OMG :o

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META-Tips: Hey Larry, What are you using to do your illustrations??

terryking228: META-Tips: Hey Larry, What are you using to do your illustrations??

I am using 'Snagit' by TechSmith.

https://www.techsmith.com/screen-capture.html

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Quick modification to the SMD third hand.

You can make the business end adjustable using syringe needles.

A sharp will get you as small as you need to go.

ThirdHand.jpg

Soldering.jpg

Anyone got any tips on best practices to mount an LCD on a panel?

I wouldn't like for example to have the LCD mounting screws showing on the front panel so I am thinking of using a piece pf plexiglass to mount the LCD right behind the panel but then you have to figure out how to deal with the opening on the front panel for the LCD to be visible. It would be nice to cut an opening on the front panel in the shape of the LCD and replace it with a piece of transparent plexiglass so that the LCD shows from behind. But, with out a CNC machine, getting everything to the exact shape is a nightmare. I am afraid the final result would't be that good.

Watcher: Anyone got any tips on best practices to mount an LCD on a panel?

I wouldn't like for example to have the LCD mounting screws showing on the front panel so I am thinking of using a piece pf plexiglass to mount the LCD right behind the panel but then you have to figure out how to deal with the opening on the front panel for the LCD to be visible. It would be nice to cut an opening on the front panel in the shape of the LCD and replace it with a piece of transparent plexiglass so that the LCD shows from behind. But, with out a CNC machine, getting everything to the exact shape is a nightmare. I am afraid the final result would't be that good.

Did you get any ideas from these posts 184, 104, 103, 109 and 132.

Edit:

It would be nice to cut an opening on the front panel in the shape of the LCD and replace it with a piece of transparent plexiglass so that the LCD shows from behind.

I used clear acrylic in post 133

getting everything to the exact shape is a nightmare.

I show how this is done without CNC in post 184

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LarryD:

I think he lives in Phoenix AZ.

OMG :o

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Scorpion city!

Watcher: Anyone got any tips on best practices to mount an LCD on a panel?

I use a template to cut the hole as above and use a bezel to mount. They are often offered as an optional extra with LED displays.

Not so common with LCD.http://www.hobbytronics.co.uk/lcd-bezel-16x2

Like they say they can be difficult to find.

Sometimes you have to make your own bezel out of thin plastic as bezel mounts do not like thick mounting panels, have a look at larry's ideas above.

For some plastic it is easy to cut by scoring and snapping.

Dressing the edges can be tedious though. I prefer flame polishing which is quick but takes practice.