Share tips you have come across

LarryD: Third last line.

"The material is high density polyethylene and weighs 6 pounds."

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That kind of info needs to be one of the first lines, not one of the last. My eyes were jumping all over the place just to find out what the thing was.

Have I done enough to proclaim my love for the Type K knife tip? No I haven’t because each time I use this thing for something new I fall harder in love.

IMG_20170226_114555262.jpg
I <3 the knife type

The first time I soldered a SOT23-3 transistor to a PCB I used a chisel tip (Hakko type D) and it SUCKED. The solder’s surface tension kept pulling it up. Even when I got it acceptably stuck down it was still off kilter and just really bad. The experience was so frustrating compared to doing SOIC or even MSOP that I dreaded trying again.

Until now. Just last night and this morning I soldered 20 SOT23-3 transistors onto breakout boards, and it was a breeze. The broad, flat surface of the knife side is excellent for holding a good blob of solder. Then you can flux up the board, heat both of the pins on the one side until it’s in a good position, then a quite swipe with the edge finishes up the last pin.

The edge is also broad enough to bridge 3 header pins at once. Flux the pins, feed solder onto the broad side, and slowly pull it down the line of headers to solder rows of headers with ridiculous efficiency. Just keep feeding the blob because it runs out quickly.

I still haven’t tried the bent type J that Larry’s suggested (I’m in the middle of rearranging/tidying up and I’ve lost track of where I put them), but the only advantage it appears to have is angling into an awkward space. I’m sure it’ll have a place next to my iron to be swapped out when needed (next to a couple sizes of chisel tips), but I can’t imagine it dethroning the knife as my default tip of choice. This thing is just that awesome.

I’ll repeat what I said the first time: This is not a cutting attachment, this is a bad ass soldering tip.

technogeekca: I live in what most of you would call a small city in Winnipeg, Canada and most of the dealers sell these. Also any dealer that sells them has the crimpers. Yes up here in Igloo's and living with the Polar Bear. Try Digikey or Mouser but if you can buy wholesale ADI has them as well.

Here's a link to the ADI Website.

https://adiglobal.us/Pages/default.aspx

Here's a link to a tool on Amazon and Platinum also sell the connectors.

https://www.amazon.com/Platinum-Tools-100054C-Clamshell-EZ-RJPRO/dp/B00939KFOU/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1488028030&sr=8-1&keywords=Platinum+Tools+100054C+Clamshell+EZ-RJPRO+HD

You should be able to buy them anywhere. Just do a google search for "easy ethernet connector" and click on the images tab.

Personally i like to the two peice connectors. You stick all the little wires through a small peice of plastic, slide the small piece all the way down to the outer insulation jacket, then cut off the excess wire and push it into an outer housing and use a crimper to crimp it. No clamshell required.

Cut the finger off an old glove.
Put a rare earth magnet in tip to help in those awkward situations.

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LarryD: Cut the finger off an old glove. Put a rare earth magnet in tip to help in those awkward situations.

Brilliant.... :)

The following describes how to make a ‘Screw vise’.
These are very effective in holding flat objects like PCB material.

The gap washer can be changed out to accommodate different thicknesses of boards.

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Edit:
You can of course use one of these instead of making the above.

Obviously, a screw works, but you then have to reach for a screw driver :wink:


Edit

See post #758 and #765 and #766

Inexpensive bull dog clips are great for holding components while soldering.
Place the clips on top of a rare earth magnets to secure them.

It is easy to rotate the clips on the magnets to get a different view point.

Many different sizes to clamp your components.

One.jpg

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I never knew what those are called!

LarryD, how many of these magnet do you have. Are you another of the earths magnetic poles?

Tom... :)

I have one living next door.
She certainly is magnetic :slight_smile:

TomGeorge: LarryD, how many of these magnet do you have. Are you another of the earths magnetic poles?

Tom... :)

We live just a few miles south of the N pole, they make these magnets here.

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Make yourself a tool tree.
The key is to accurately drill ~1/2 down the standoff with a 1/8" brad bit.

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Tree3.jpg

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In the last image, the drill bit should be a brad point bit.
Too cold in the garage to take a picture of it.

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Also, make a hardware cup to store nuts etc. maybe wine :wink: .

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Tooltree is neat.

LarryD:
Also, make a hardware cup to store nuts etc. maybe wine :wink: .

4.jpg

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What advantage does this have over magnetic parts trays? This seems unnecessarily top heavy.

Larry, Larry...

This stuff is fantastic...

These are great projects. I will be posting mine pretty soon.

I am looking forward to hosting all this stuff on http://ArduinoInfo.Info

.. If the authors agree..

Could be done in Wiki fashion, or other pages if someone wants to develop pages differently..

Other suggestions??

Help yourself to anything I've posted. Would that just be recreating the Playground though? Honestly I haven't been there much.

Jiggy-Ninja: What advantage does this have over magnetic parts trays? This seems unnecessarily top heavy.

Since the cup is above the magnet there will be no magnetizing of the parts within, maybe an advantage.

Top heavy, no, there is a powerful magnet holding the cup to the 304 stainless steel.

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