Share tips you have come across

"Do you really need the ST-M to Dupont-F converter?"
The black ST connectors I show are the same as your red ones.
For easy breadboard connection, DuPont is the answer, so I made the converter.

You could just use battery to DuPont female.
Or, maybe Red to female and Black to male, therefore polarity would be observed.

I am in the habit of using ST connectors like those shown and yours with power supplies as they maintain polarity.

I am sold on crimp connectors too.

Never solder crimps as you have no give at the connector.
The wire will break at this spot.
The name is crimp connector :wink:

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ST male to Dupont male I would understand, I just don't know why you went with Dupont female.

You could also just cut the plastic shroud off the male ST connector before putting the pins in to get something breadboardable.

Jiggy-Ninja:
ST male to Dupont male I would understand, I just don't know why you went with Dupont female.

You could also just cut the plastic shroud off the male ST connector before putting the pins in to get something breadboardable.

I went to a DuPont female to prevent accidental shorting of battery leads when the battery wire is dangling in the air.
By using the male to male header pins plugged into the breadboard, you can easily plug the female DuPont onto them to make your connection.

Cutting the shroud off does expose the ST male pins, but these are really too large to be used with a breadboard.
Better stick to header pins which are .025" square.

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OK, I am a bit slow, but eventually I learn.
It can be a bit difficult to pick up solder from the work bench.
Rolling a bent piece can make it easier.

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Next tip, how to tie up those strings dangling from your shoes so you can stop tripping over them. :smiley:

Take it away, Gary!

Jiggy-Ninja:
How did you make the PDFs you used in the other threads? Rather than having it all scattered across a dozen and a half pages I think a single PDF or something in the front post that's kept up to date would be good. I'd be willing to make it if you point me the right way. One ring to rule them all reference for these obscure but useful tips would be great.

I've taken about as much as I've contributed here, so I love this thread. I don't want to lose anything in here.

These days for Word documents I simply save as PDF (since I had Word 2010)

Prior to this I used (and sometimes still do) PDF995 - you install this and then you get a sort of virtual printer which you can select from any application via its print button - instead of selecting, say "Epson SX130" or whatever printer you have, you select PDF995 from the printer drop-down list. PDF995 then asks for the usial info to save the document ie where you want it, what to call it etc. http://www.pdf995.com

There are of course other, similar products on the market.

LarryD:
I went to a DuPont female to prevent accidental shorting of battery leads when the battery wire is dangling in the air.
By using the male to male header pins plugged into the breadboard, you can easily plug the female DuPont onto them to make your connection.

Cutting the shroud off does expose the ST male pins, but these are really too large to be used with a breadboard.
Better stick to header pins which are .025" square.

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That still doesn't answer why you needed to convert ST female to Dupont female. Don't the headers fit into the ST female plug?

Jiggy-Ninja:
url=http://watch

Did you mean to post a link to a local domain name?

Oops, fixed it.

Jiggy-Ninja:
That still doesn't answer why you needed to convert ST female to Dupont female. Don't the headers fit into the ST female plug?

No, they are not designed to do that.
The ST male pin is flatter and wider than the DuPont male pin.

A header pin would flatten the ST female inside spring, as a result, I have the ST-M to DuPont-F interface.

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If you have a SMD rework station like this or a Hakko FX888D, buy extra soldering irons so you don’t have to replace tip size. Just plug in a different iron.
~$13
An added benefit is you will have spare elements.
For 927 852D
http://www.ebay.ca/itm/50W-24V-Soldering-Iron-Handle-for-4mm-900M-T-tip-Soldering-station-936-852-907A-/321249916263?hash=item4acbfcb567:g:TIgAAOxyRNJShKCf

For FX888D
http://www.ebay.ca/itm/322120103473

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Jiggy-Ninja:
Next tip, how to tie up those strings dangling from your shoes so you can stop tripping over them. :smiley:

Take it away, Gary!

I don't think Bob's doing it right!

LarryD:
Modify RJ45 plugs so you can more easily terminate a cable with them.

When drilling the connector, let the drill do the work (do not force the process).

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I hate to burst anyone’s bubble since this is by far the best thread on this Forum but I have been using what they call “Easy on Ethernet Connectors” that are exactly like this for at least 5 years. The crimper tool that I purchased already has a blade in it to flush cut the ends and it was only five bucks more than a standard crimper. Works for both RJ-45 as well 4 and 6 Pin RJ-11 Connectors. I believe that Paladin makes a lower cost tool for those who don’t do millions of these ends.

With the amount of connectors I put on some days drilling and heat polishing them would kill me.

I have been using what they call "Easy on Ethernet Connectors" that are exactly like this for at least 5 years. The crimper tool that I purchased already has a blade in it to flush cut the ends and it was only five bucks more than a standard crimper.

Please! A source?? Thanks!

** OK I'll do some looking. Thanks..

I live in what most of you would call a small city in Winnipeg, Canada and most of the dealers sell these. Also any dealer that sells them has the crimpers. Yes up here in Igloo's and living with the Polar Bear. Try Digikey or Mouser but if you can buy wholesale ADI has them as well.

Here's a link to the ADI Website.

https://adiglobal.us/Pages/default.aspx

Here's a link to a tool on Amazon and Platinum also sell the connectors.

You should be able to buy them anywhere. Just do a google search for "easy ethernet connector" and click on the images tab.

technogeekca:
I hate to burst anyone's bubble since this is by far the best thread on this Forum but I have been using what they call "Easy on Ethernet Connectors" that are exactly like this for at least 5 years. The crimper tool that I purchased already has a blade in it to flush cut the ends and it was only five bucks more than a standard crimper. Works for both RJ-45 as well 4 and 6 Pin RJ-11 Connectors. I believe that Paladin makes a lower cost tool for those who don't do millions of these ends.

With the amount of connectors I put on some days drilling and heat polishing them would kill me.

No bubble to burst here.

Yes, they have been available for some years now.

This just discuses how to turn your current connectors into the same, about 2 minutes each.

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Have custom perfboards made - i.e. part prototyping perfboard, part recurring (SMD) circuit.
custom_perfboard.jpg
This board is 5x10cm^2 and has custom pads for a Wemos D1 Mini + power circuitry to power it with up to 28V.
SMD pads are for an LDO+caps, with jumpers to either power the 5V or the 3.3V pin of the D1 Mini and 5V/3.3V/GND access on both sides.
Above the LDO circuit, an MP1584 module can be placed (which does not fit the usual grid well).
Above the MP1584 goes the D1 Mini, so all this does not increase the footprint of the D1 Mini at all.
I mostly use it for 12V LED dimmer stuff.

With current PCB service prices from China, one board costs 25ct. (v-cut 10x10cm^2 board, not counting shipping). Thats not even a bad price for a normal plated-through perfboard, and there, the functionality would probably have thrice the footprint (at least with through-hole components).
Hope they don’t hate me for all the drilling :wink:

Not sure if these have been done but here goes...

I often buy wall PSU's from the thrift shop and sometimes I get a DOA but the lead is often fine.
Problem with most of them is that both wires are the same colour.

Problem solved with a small amount of heatshrink place far enough up in case I have to re-work the ends.

Not everyone can afford the good third hand devices and some of us get these.
Whilst useful they do have a couple of minor drawbacks.
First is that they do tend to tip over on occasion.
Second is that many don't allow you to move the claws close together.

solved with a small piece of plywood and a couple of screws as far as tipping.

Drilled and CS a couple of extra holes for the screws

Also extended one claw with some redundant threaded rod.

You could use almost anything to do the mods but its what I had close to hand

Continued from above

It can be fun to create an all in one assembly work surface.
The ‘Bread Board’ work surface described here has many pluses.
• is inexpensive, about $15 for the base.
• stays where it is placed as it has a reasonable weight ~6lbs.
• relocatable to another location.
• you can turn to any of the four sides for the viewpoint required.
• can be cut to size.
• is easily tapped for screws.
• can have bulldog clamps mounted at different angles.
• FR4 PCB material can be mounted so you can solder sections to it as shown in post 15.
• stainless steel 304 material can be mounted to have a sturdy magnetic surface.
• can have magnetic cups mounted within (use rare earth ring magnets for removability).
• standoffs with set screws can be mounted to securely hold items.
• angle brackets/motors/bezels/panels/LCDs/switches . . . can be easily mounted.
• mount SK10 breadboards.
• absorbs hammering.
• drillable with forstner bits to large diameters: hold bottles and make component/debris wells.
• easily routed and filed.
• add magnets at strategic locations to hold an existing third hand assembly.
• slotted to hold work in an upright position.
• accepts double stick (double sided) tape.
• can be inverted to expose the underside which has be modified for specific tasks.
• can be moved to the edge of the bench for components to hang down.
• mount a second story of the same material such as 2” X 2” to get more height for components.
• second story can be turned to allow an external clamp to be used.
• the 1 inch thickness allows you to drill in from the side to store items. (dowelling, hardware etc.)
• glue will not adhere to the surface which allows you to glue other items together.
• could be hot welded.
• won’t scratch surfaces.
• inexpensive to replace when surfaces have deteriorated.

Other suggestions welcomed.

Problems with the material:

  • may have hidden voids in the center
  • the middle is concave about 1/16” (to hold meat juices)
  • melts easily

I am sure available sizes vary.
The ones I have been using are 11.75” square at .94” thick.
The material is high density polyethylene and weighs 6 pounds.
These can be found at kitchen supply stores, I get mine at ‘Superstore’.
This takes the ‘Bread Board’ to a whole new height.

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