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Torsion Spring Clamp #2

For more tip options on the Torsion Spring Clamp, add a brass standoff to receive different screw shapes.

Prior to Lead soldering the stainless steel (SS) rod to the brass standoff, screw a SS screw into the standoff.

This prevents solder wicking down the threads.

9V battery connectors

Many of us old timers recycle battery connectors.

When you “Fall Back” (go to daylight savings time) and replace your smoke detector batteries, salvage the connector.

I have been caught several times by newly purchased battery connectors becoming intermittent; I therefore often use recycled connectors.

Solder 20 AWG wires to these and apply a few dabs of silicone glue for insulating. IMHO wire with silicone insulation is best.

Tin the wires and the back of the terminals before soldering them together.

Newer 9-volt connectors are made of plastic, so you must quickly solder wires to the terminals.

ALWAYS confirm the polarity of your terminals, the positive male battery terminal fits to the female ‘project’ connector terminal which is what we are making above.

Use the bottom insulator from the battery as "backing" for the homemade clip...

PICT3199.jpg

PICT3199.jpg

Damn, I threw out the bottoms :(.


The following method gives good results when joining two wires.

Liquid flux improves the soldering process.

Ceramic tweezers ‘do not’ absorb heat during the soldering process, however, stainless steel tweezers can be used too.

After tinning the ends, it is time to solder the two wires together.

Flat nose pliers are used to level the center section of the tinned ends.

Ceramic tweezers are used to hold the wires during the soldering process.

When it comes to more than two wires, use a 30 AWG wire strand tied in a simple ‘overhand’ or ‘larks head’ knot.

Hi Larry and FansOfLarry,

Subject "Nut Starter" . I am testing / writing How-To for a "Robot Arm" kit which is arduino controlled and servo based. A supplier I work with has a pretty nice kit [THIS] but the instructions are terrible, the code is not much better, and my 80-year-old hands give me a clue about how 8 year old hands might find assembly of M2 and M3 hardware pretty frustrating.

Back in Ancient History I built some Heathkits and they came with these very useful plastic Nut Starters that could hold a small 4-40 or 6-32 hex nut to get it started on a small screw. I need to find some 'tool' or material that can do this for M2 and M3 hex nuts, and is CHEAP so I can give it away with every kit.

The GoodOldHeathkit ones look like this:

All I can find are semi-expensive stuff LIKE THESE

I have supplied small pieces of plastic straw from the supermarket that worked OK on small 6-32 hex nuts. But they are just wrong for 2mm hex (4mm across flats) or 3mm hex (5.5mm across flats).

Can you suggest anything I might be able to put in these kits?? I hate to suggest to a young kid that they use a small lump of Toilet Ring Wax. Although that DOES work :slight_smile:

I did search on arduino.cc but Larry may have a Secret Solution I missed???

Regards, Terry

Hi Terry

See post #684-686

Heat shrink adjusts to the ‘nut’ diameter. :slight_smile:

Maybe include a nail, some heat shrink and a link to 684; teaches people to be inventive.

You need to catch up ;).


Also might be interested in post 777.

Something like these

Hey Larry. That was a fast solution! And very Elegant. As my friend Peng would say... 很好看

I will try to get the supplier to package the nuts that way. They have done a nice job, basically, with 12 small labelled ziplock bags for the fasteners.

Suggestion: Edit the original post to add the phrase "Nut Starter" somewhere. So I can find it with a search next time.

You need to catch up ;).

I've been trying to catch up. Almost forever. I remember well running to catch up to my parents in the evening in August 1945, in my short pants with my American Flag.

“ Suggestion: Edit the original post to add the phrase "Nut Starter" somewhere. So I can find it with a search next time. ”

Done :).


Actually, it should be easy to make those nut starters using 4:1 glue lined heat shrink tubing.

i.e. 4mm on one side and 5.5mm on the other.

Nut starter

Use 4:1 glue lined heat shrink to make nut starters.

You can make these to accommodate 1 or 2 nuts as seen in the images below.

Make a nut starter tool sized M3, M2, 2-56, etc. ahead of time so they are ready to use when they are needed.

Edit.

Just tried 2:1 regular heat shrink (no glue).

This works quite well; you need a 3/16” pre-shrunk diameter to get a final rigid tool for M2 nuts.

M2 not 2M :confused:

BTW, when finished using the driver, leave nuts in the tool, prevents the end from flattening.

I remember the Heathkit tools...

I have supplied small pieces of plastic straw from the supermarket that worked OK on small 6-32 hex nuts. But they are just wrong for 2mm hex (4mm across flats) or 3mm hex (5.5mm across flats).

Straws are available in a really wide variety of sizes, from "coffee stirrers" with ID ~1/16 inch up to "boba" straws ~1/2 inch. Unfortunately, exact diameters aren't usually listed in the product information on Amazon :frowning:

Can you suggest anything I might be able to put in these kits?? I hate to suggest to a young kid that they use a small lump of Toilet Ring Wax. Although that DOES work

Silly Putty? Blue-tack? (Silly putty does tend to "sag")

Soldering a bent pin header to the top of a PCB is frustrating at the best of times.

The header does not usually sit flush.

The parallel jaws of cross-locking tweezers help make these soldering jobs quick and easy.

As seen in the image below, depending on the size of your PCB, either straight or curved tweezers can be used as a soldering aid.

You will get great ‘flush header’ results which is what we always look for.

If the header is quite long, use two tweezers.

A wire splice is a reasonable solution to connect a large gauge wire to DuPont pin connectors.

If you need a higher current connection, use two DuPont pins.

The reverse is also true; a 30 AWG sensor wire can be spliced to a more reasonable 22/24 AWG wire.

Further to post #659.

Use a syringe to make a tool for cutting equal length pieces of heat shrink or wire.

You can usually get syringes in 1, 1.5, 3, 5, 10 and 20 ml sizes.

A 1.5 ml syringe can be used for different sized heat shrink from 1/16” to 3/16” in diameter.

A 3 ml syringe is good for 1/4” to 5/8”.

I use the 1.5 and 3 ml sizes for 90% of projects.

Cut off the hub end of your syringe with a razor saw or utility knife; a flame will get rid of burrs.

Move the plunger to the cut off end.

The barrel flange makes a nice flat surface to rest your nippy cutters on.

Further to post #730.

Replacing a potentiometer with two SMD resistors has been covered earlier in this thread.

Now we are using machine pin headers to raise the SMD resistors above the board rather than mounting them on Kapton tape.

Use 3 header pins with the top pins cut off flush to the surface.

Solder the 3 pins at the old potentiometer location.

As before, after measuring the potentiometer setting, select ‘actual’ standard SMD resistors and confirm they will
work in place of the pot.

Since the SMD resistors are ceramic, it would be best to add UV or hot glue over these to prevent breakage.

Old version:

There are times when you need a firmer grip on life.

Add a binder clip on the end of a clamp arm gives you a stronger pinch.

An M2 threaded end on the arm allows you to change to a different size clip.

A locking knurled nut holds the clip at the orientation needed.

larryd:
There are times when you need a firmer grip on life.

Add a binder clip on the end of a clamp arm gives you a stronger pinch.

They are known as bulldog clips in the UK.

:o I am in love :wink: . . .

Tell me more about "silver soldering" stainless steel...
I have some stainless I'd like to solder, and it's being a real pain.

Did you read this one already ?