Shooting target practice

Hello

I am just wondering and I’m a newbie working with arduino. But I am just wondering I’d like to create a shooting targets for airsoft and wondering what would be the best way to go about it.

I was thinking using a servo to raise the target and then move the servo back to normal position and then use a button or trigger once the target is shot it will fall on the button.

But I’m wondering is there any better way of doing it like is it possible to use the servo to detect a hit?

No. You can’t detect a hit with a servo. I would recommend using a piezo disc to sense the hit, like the common “knock sensor” projects:

Howvabout an H-bridge motor driver driving a pully motor back (left and right).
One pulley on left side of target, one on right.
Single cable/rope loop going around one pulley on the top and coming back on the underside of
the pulley across the target under the other
pully and connected to the starting point creating
a closed loop around the pulleys. Targets are
hung from lower part of loop. Code runs random speed up and slow down loop. Target move left to right. You can vary delay between speed changes
to get longer periods of consistent speed.
Detecting hits is much more complicated because
projectile is so small, but if I had to do it I
would make the target out of material that makes
the most noise on impact and simply detect
impact sound using parabolic dish microphone
panning left and right (another h-bridge driver)
controlled by same arduino so it knows EXACTLY
when the speed will change and by how much
and it knows (by geometry) what spoed to drive the panning motor to track the targets. If you
record the impact sound and view it on an iphone spectrum analyzer app (I have one) and find put
the impact frequency you can built a notch detect
circuit (Narrow Band-Pass Filter) and then you can add a comparator
level detect circuit set to trigger for sound.
When you move closer to target sound increases
and you adjust trigger level down. Whe you move
away from target sound level goes down so you have to readjust trigger level lower.
H-bridge mosfet bds are cheap on ebay. I just
bought two at about $5/each.

raschemmel:
Howvabout an H-bridge motor driver driving a pully motor back (left and right).
One pulley on left side of target, one on right.
Single cable/rope loop going around one pulley on the top and coming back on the underside of
the pulley across the target under the other
pully and connected to the starting point creating
a closed loop around the pulleys. Targets are
hung from lower part of loop. Code runs random speed up and slow down loop. Target move left to right. You can vary delay between speed changes
to get longer periods of consistent speed.
Detecting hits is much more complicated because
projectile is so small, but if I had to do it I
would make the target out of material that makes
the most noise on impact and simply detect
impact sound using parabolic dish microphone
panning left and right (another h-bridge driver)
controlled by same arduino so it knows EXACTLY
when the speed will change and by how much
and it knows (by geometry) what spoed to drive the panning motor to track the targets. If you
record the impact sound and view it on an iphone spectrum analyzer app (I have one) and find put
the impact frequency you can built a notch detect
circuit (instead of filtering notch frequency it amplifies it, and then you can add a comparator
level detect circuit set to trigger for sound.
When you move closer to target sound increases
and you adjust trigger level down. Whe you move
away from target sound level goes down so you have to readjust trigger level lower.
H-bridge mosfet bds are cheap on ebay. I just
bought two at about $5/each.

pert:
No. You can't detect a hit with a servo. I would recommend using a piezo disc to sense the hit, like the common "knock sensor" projects:
https://www.arduino.cc/en/tutorial/knock

Thank you for your response and trying to help.

Here is a great example of what I would like to achieve. Xcortech XTS 105 Debut - YouTube

If you go to 5.00 minute you will see it in action. It’s a whack a mole game mode meaning the targets show up randomly.

The programming side is easy since I study software development and I have a way I would go about it. Just need a way to move the target up and register the hit.

That's simple. RC servos are designed to drive
the linkage rod between the servo and the aileron, rudder , or horizontal stabilizer. They are not designed to move objects. Arduino hobbyists just
don't 'get' this because they have never built and flown a plane. As long as you THINK like a plane
builder it will be obvious because you are not
going to try to move the target with the servo.
You are going to mount the target with a servo horn very close to the pivot point and drive the horn with a standard aircraft linkage rod (which of course you've never heard of or seen) and choose
a servo based on the torque required based on
target weight . A servo can rotate 180 degrees !
The target is only rotating 90 degrees !
Do the math !
As long as the target is nothing more than a giant
horizontal stabilizer /rudder/ aileron and the linkage and servo placed exactly like it would be in
a model plane, it will work. You need to study
model aircraft design FIRST ! Then it will be clear to
you. If you do NOT study it then you won't 'get'
it. USE LINKAGE ! DRIVE THE SERVO HORN !

If you still don't 'get' it, go to a hobby store and ask the owner to explain it. Show him a printout of
my posts. He'll explain it to you. You CAN'T pick the servo UNTIL you design the PLANE !
They have model airplanes with rudders bigger
than you target so don't tell me won't work.

raschemmel:
That's simple. RC servos are designed to drive
the linkage rod between the servo and the aileron, rudder , or horizontal stabilizer. They are not designed to move objects. Arduino hobbyists just
don't 'get' this because they have never built and flown a plane. As long as you THINK like a plane
builder it will be obvious because you are not
going to try to move the target with the servo.
You are going to mount the target with a servo horn very close to the pivot point and drive the horn with a standard aircraft linkage rod (which of course you've never heard of or seen) and choose
a servo based on the torque required based on
target weight . A servo can rotate 180 degrees !
The target is only rotating 90 degrees !
Do the math !
As long as the target is nothing more than a giant
horizontal stabilizer /rudder/ aileron and the linkage and servo placed exactly like it would be in
a model plane, it will work. You need to study
model aircraft design FIRST ! Then it will be clear to
you. If you do NOT study it then you won't 'get'
it. USE LINKAGE ! DRIVE THE SERVO HORN !

If you still don't 'get' it, go to a hobby store and ask the owner to explain it. Show him a printout of
my posts. He'll explain it to you. You CAN'T pick the servo UNTIL you design the PLANE !
They have model airplanes with rudders bigger
than you target so don't tell me won't work.

Yes that’s the way I was going to do it. So basically servo will move the target up and the it will go back down and then just use a button that the target will fall on that will register the hit.

NO !
Servo is NOT connected to the target!
Servo is conntected to lunkage rod.
Linkage rod connected to servo horn on target.
The servo separated from the target by the linkage
and servo size is chosen for target weight.
plus you may need to add counter weights (they
sell them at the hobby store) to balance the target weight. It's a rod comming out at some angle with
a weight onthe end so the target and the counterbalance are such that the target balances half up an half down ( midway) requiring less torque, allowingbyou to use smaller servo.

POST A DRAWING WITH DIMENSIONS

Yes that’s what I mean. And do you how I could use the Ethernet cable for this like they are using in the video? Like using Ethernet cable to power the servo and to connect it to the arduino board?

I don't need to watch a video.
Just google Ethernet connector pinout
I don't understand what you are asking .
It's a cable . Pick any pins and connect thecwires.
What's to know ?
Ao only has 3 WIRES !
You don't need an 8-conductor ethernet cable.
All you need is a 4-conductor PHONE cable.
They may have paired upbthe wires to get
lower resistance by using two or three wires for the +V , two oe three for the GND, and the last twio
for the lowcurrent signal. By using three wires
for blk and 3 for red and 2 for signal, it would
work further away than with the wire guage
that comes on the servo.

So I can connect power to 1 servo and then connect the 1 servo to 2 servo then 2 servo to 3 servo and then from the 3 servo to the piece that will control them and they will all get the power and will all be linked through the phone cable?

Phone cable won't work, too much resistance if it's any longer than about 20 cm to get sufficient current to the servo. Ethernet cable is similar thickness but you can use three of them for Vcc and three for GND, leaving the last two for signal (where one conductor is of course enough). Then you have a reasonable chance of it working on such thin wires.

Mind that servos take easily 1-2A of current each (check the data sheet of your specific servos), design your power wires to handle that. For ease of connecting your servos may share power wires. The signal wire of course has to be a separate wire for each servo.

To detect the hit with a bounce plate you may have to make sure the projectile directly hits the sensor. So the bounce plate itself should be your target. Well, maybe mounting a piece of sheet metal on top of that to take the impact of the projectile is a good idea to have it survive.

Another option is indeed some kind of tilting mechanism. The projectile hits the target, it falls backwards (visually indicating to the shooter they have a hit), in the process releasing (or hitting) a microswitch. Retracting the target with the servo can then right the target again for the next shot. Button will have to be built inside the moving part itself.

Just curious, are you planning to expand the number of targets to something like that shown in the video?

I didn't watch the video but based on last reply it sounds like two wires are used for servo red & black power and that leaves 6 signal wires for six targets.

Red and black daisy chained to all six targets.

dougp:
Just curious, are you planning to expand the number of targets to something like that shown in the video?

raschemmel:
I didn't watch the video but based on last reply it sounds like two wires are used for servo red & black power and that leaves 6 signal wires for six targets.

Red and black daisy chained to all six targets.

Well I know I could do 6 with the Ethernet cable but I was just wondering out did they achieve more then 6 by just using the Ethernet cable.

Also would it be possible to use nodemcu esp8266 and just have one for each servo and control it through wifi or Bluetooth? And then just use 1 cable to power them all?

It seems obvious they used an ethernet cable
for ethernet The signal can be generated
with the Servo() Library. A nano (or pro mini ) can read ethernet with an ethernet interface.
They designed their own board for the target
and made multiple boards.
Why isn't that obvious ?
I'm not understanding your
question because it's obvious
they are using the ethenet
cable to send ethernet commands.
Do you not understand how the can control
a servo driven by a nano talking over ethernet
?
They did their homework.
Sure , you can do what they did.
It's simple.
Just do what they did.
Until I watched the video I thought you were
talking about some limited function DIY system
but now I realize you are asking HOW a company
(even of 1 employee) R&Ded an ethernet based
target. Everything they did is simple.

Get a cable with more cores, if you want to go that way. Make sure your wires are thick enough to carry the servo currents.

You best connect that cable to a PCB or perfboard on which you have placed connectors, one for each servo. That’s gonna make installation and maintenance a lot easier.

Of course you could place a NodeMCU at every servo… but then you just trade one very simple problem (a bunch of wires - if you think “Oh but an Arduino can’t do that many servos!” you probably just don’t know about the PCA9685 yet) for a much harder and more expensive one (lots of MCUs, wireless communication, etc).

raschemmel:
Everything they did is simple.

Tomstud122:
I am just wondering and I’m a newbie working with arduino.

Simple depends on one's perspective.

Simply put , this project is beyond your skill level.
"You can't get there from here."
You can't go from knowing nothing to
knowing everything in one post.
Do your honework.
Everything is on the arduino website under
"Learning" or you can search the forum .
I never say "Good Luck" because it isn't luck.
It's hard work and determination that gets
the job done.
Sorry, but no shortcuts here.

raschemmel:
It seems obvious they used an ethernet cable
for ethernet The signal can be generated
with the Servo() Library. A nano (or pro mini ) can read ethernet with an ethernet interface.
They designed their own board for the target
and made multiple boards.
Why isn't that obvious ?
I'm not understanding your
question because it's obvious
they are using the ethenet
cable to send ethernet commands.
Do you not understand how the can control
a servo driven by a nano talking over ethernet
?
They did their homework.
Sure , you can do what they did.
It's simple.
Just do what they did.
Until I watched the video I thought you were
talking about some limited function DIY system
but now I realize you are asking HOW a company
(even of 1 employee) R&Ded an ethernet based
target. Everything they did is simple.

Thank you for that, sorry for not being clear what I was wondering would it be possible to do it with arduino like connecting them all with there own WiFi controller like the nodemcu esp8266

if you hinge the targets
mount them on a shaft.
rotate the shaft
when the target is haning straight down, then rotate up, it would be ready.
when it, the hinge would let if fall down.
let gravity do your work.