Signal Light

How large/how bright of a light could I fit on an Arduino without it blowing up? I'm looking to put a sort of signal light/strobe on it but it needs to be big enough to be able to see from a distance. There will also be a wifi shield on the board.

Owninjoe: How large/how bright of a light could I fit on an Arduino without it blowing up? I'm looking to put a sort of signal light/strobe on it but it needs to be big enough to be able to see from a distance. There will also be a wifi shield on the board.

Oh, very bright. Huge. Depending on the distance. We don't know what you mean by "a distance".

Read the data sheet for the particular chip you are using. Look for current source/sink data. (Don't use absolute maximum ratings, use typical or stay well under the max if typical ratings are not available.) Then see if you can find a light source that will do what you want within those limits.

i think you are limited to 3 clear cased simple white leds connected in parralel, you also need a 82ohm resistor in series of all this parallel thing

for more... you need transistors

you also need to direct the beam to where you are looking from

You could flash a light house on and off with the right driving circuit.

KenF: You could flash a light house on and off with the right driving circuit.

The light needs to be powered by the board however, so we need something that is bright enough/large enough to see from say, 20 meters away in any direction.

We would like something similar to this on the Arduino...

http://www.fleetfarm.com/detail/WOLO-Brite-Star-Strobe-Light/0000000007299?utm_source=googleps&utm_medium=shopping%2Bsearch&utm_campaign=google%2Bproduct%20search&gslfah&gclid=CJCRiIfm_8ICFYdaMgodOV0AgQ

Powered by the board .

Depends on where the board is getting its supply from

Those things need 12 v

Others here have experimented with disposable camera flash guns which run off 1.5 v Do a search

it depends if you are passing power throught the onboard regulator or even worse you are using a pin to light it
(never parralel i\o pins however) (and don’t consider a microcontroller as a powersupply)

that thing probably has an incandescence bulb, you cannot power bulbs with an arduino unless they are pretty small

use a mosfet or even a tip122 powered at 12V

No thats a xenon strobe

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/5v-6v-OPTICAL-SLAVE-10ws-FLASH-module-DIY-KIT-strobe-photography-project-/121164510070?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item1c35f7b376

That has an opto isolator option which makes it ideal?

Not obvious what the current requirment is but if its a flyback configuration it should still work if you current limit it and give a longer charge time.

Thats a 50 joule unit.

Using a smaller capacitor would reduce intensity and required current

sorry i thought it was a toy... :) a had one of those "toys"

then you need to connect the arduino to the trigger transformer like this

don't expect you can trigger it like 20 a second, it needs to recharge

So what would you guys recommend doing? Could we splice the power cable for the arduino/light that I posted a little bit ago together so that the light is not being powered off of the board?

i think you cannot power a big light off the board just choose your light source, we will suggest you how to connect it to the arduino

The light we just purchased is the WOLO Beacon light. We just need to know how to attach it. It doesn't need to be powered off of the board, but we need to be able to turn it on and off through the code.

Light: http://www.amazon.com/Wolo-3110-R-Beacon-Rotating-Warning/dp/B000BNH0UE/ref=sr_1_10?ie=UTF8&qid=1422304406&sr=8-10&keywords=WOLO+light

perfect this time i really think it has a filament light bulb use a power transistor or a mosfet to drive it, maybe take out the mirror to direct the light at 360°

you need to connect the + of the light to a +12V connect the collector\drain of the transistor to the - of the light connect the emitter\source of the transistor to the gnd of the system connect an output of the arduino trought a 1k resistor to the base\gate of the transistor

you can use a TIP122 (darlington BJT) or a logic mosfet (wait a minute i'm searching the most stupid\common\cheap model and i'll tell you)

the IRLZ44N seems the most common\stupid\powerfull\suitable with a mosfet instead of a darlington you can count on a bit more luminous power you can order some of these, they are usefull

ensure to have a 12V power suply capable of at least 2Amperes

So would you recommend a product from this page?

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_0_10?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=logic+mosfet&sprefix=logic+mosf%2Caps%2C181

Then, let me see if I understand you correctly:

We would need to cut a segment off of the cable from the light, buy a separate power adapter, and wire those two together. Then ground to a breadboard. The mosfet would be used to... toggle the light on and off? I'm a little fuzzy on how this would look.

Given the way the light is designed, how many cables should I expect? Two for power and ground? or More?

you can omit the diode

Vout has no connection

Rin is 1k

Rgs is 10k

+Vin is the arduino pin

+Vdd is +12V

0V is the common GND

you can power both the arduino and the "system" with the same power supply (use the +12V on the barrel DC jack and common all the GNDs) as long the power supply can deliver 12V and minimum 2A

Opto Isolator uC interface for strobe flash

I understand your circuit schematic for the most part ScrewPilot with a few questions however. What is the large blue circle? and secondly, where would the mosfet go/how would it work?