Simple 2-coloured static gradient is not exactly what I want

Hello folks!
So i just got my very first Adafruit items yesterday. I read alot of tutorials and watched videos on Youtube to prepare myself a bit before, even if my project is really easy compared to many others.

So basically I want to light up a WS2812 LED strip with 60 pixels in a red-to-orange static gradient and I didn’t know how to do that. So i worked overnight today and I honestly just found three websites with people searching for the same help and I got so far that I have a code which works! So I just changed the colours to the ones I am aiming for and so far, so good.

Now there’s only one little thing left which bothers me and that’s the length of the gradient. Right now my gradient reaches from one end to the other. What I want is a shorter gradient in the middle, like on this picture (won’t show it sadly so here’s the link)
Imgur

Here is my code, I am working with an Adafruit Trinket Pro 5V

// There are multiple examples below showing the use of
//   fill_gradient, and fill_gradient_RGB
//
// Un-comment examples one at a time to experiment.
//
// Note1:
//   When filling all the way to the end always use NUM_LEDS-1.
//   (If you don't subtract 1 then it will break things.)
//
// Note2:
//   When using fill_gradient_RGB, do NOT include gradient direction
//   info (FORWARD_HUES, BACKWARD_HUES, SHORTEST_HUES, LONGEST_HUES)
//
// Marc Miller,  Nov 2016
//---------------------------------------------------------------

#include "FastLED.h"
#define LED_TYPE WS2812B
#define DATA_PIN 6
//#define CLOCK_PIN 13
#define NUM_LEDS 60
#define COLOR_ORDER GRB
#define MASTER_BRIGHTNESS 180
CRGB leds[NUM_LEDS];

CHSV gsHSV(0,255,255);  // grad start color in HSV format
CHSV geHSV(128,255,255);  // grad end color in HSV format

CRGB gsRGB(255,0,0);  // grad start color in RGB format
CRGB geRGB(0,255,0);  // grad end color in RGB format

uint8_t num = 0;  // stores a number when animating grad

  
//---------------------------------------------------------------
void setup() { 
  Serial.begin(115200);  // Allows serial monitor output (check baud rate)
  delay(3000);  // startup delay
  FastLED.addLeds<LED_TYPE, DATA_PIN, COLOR_ORDER>(leds, NUM_LEDS);
  //FastLED.addLeds<LED_TYPE, DATA_PIN, CLOCK_PIN, COLOR_ORDER>(leds, NUM_LEDS);
  FastLED.setBrightness(MASTER_BRIGHTNESS);
}

//---------------------------------------------------------------
void loop() {
  EVERY_N_MILLISECONDS(250) {
    num = num + 4;
    Serial.print(" num = "); Serial.println(num);
  
    /* ---------------Fill gradient using HSV format---------------
    * All three of these display the same output.
    *   The first inputs the color directly in HSV values.
    *   The second uses the HSV colors defined up above.
    *   The third uses the HSV colors defined up above and shows how to break out the h,s,v parts. 
    * These gradients are static.
    */
    
    //fill_gradient(leds, 0, CHSV(0,255,255), NUM_LEDS-1, CHSV(128,255,255), SHORTEST_HUES);
    //fill_gradient(leds, 0, gsHSV, NUM_LEDS-1, geHSV, SHORTEST_HUES);
    //fill_gradient(leds, 0, CHSV(gsHSV.h,gsHSV.s,gsHSV.v), NUM_LEDS-1, CHSV(geHSV.h,geHSV.s,geHSV.v), SHORTEST_HUES);


    
    /*----------- 
    * This shows how you could operate on the r,g,b parts of a previously defined
    *   HSV color, or only use some combination of the h, s, or v components.
    * This gradient is animated.
    */

    //fill_gradient(leds, 0, CHSV(gsHSV.h+num, random8(100,256), gsHSV.v), NUM_LEDS-1, CHSV(geHSV.h+num, geHSV.s, random8(180,256)), SHORTEST_HUES);




    /* ---------------Fill gradient using RGB format---------------
    * All three of these display the same output.
    *   The first inputs the color directly in RGB values.
    *   The second uses the RGB colors defined up above.
    *   The third uses the RGB colors defined up above and shows how to break out the h,s,v parts.
    * These gradients are static.
    * *Note* Do NOT use SHORTEST_HUES on the end.
    */
    
    fill_gradient_RGB(leds, 0, CRGB(255,0,0), NUM_LEDS-1, CRGB(255,64,0));
    //fill_gradient_RGB(leds, 0, gsRGB, NUM_LEDS-1, geRGB);
    //fill_gradient_RGB(leds, 0, CRGB(gsRGB.r, gsRGB.g, gsRGB.b), NUM_LEDS-1, CRGB(geRGB.r, geRGB.g, geRGB.b));


    /*---------- 
    * This shows how you could operate on the r,g,b parts of a previously defined
    *   RGB color, or only use some combination of the r, g, or b components.
    * This gradient is animated.
    */

    //fill_gradient_RGB( leds, 0, CRGB(gsRGB.r+num, gsRGB.g, 255), NUM_LEDS-1, CRGB(0, geRGB.g+num, random8(0,64)) );



    FastLED.show();  //display the pixels
  }
  
}//end main loop

I also tried to add/lower the number of used LEDs to get a different effect each time, but sadly it’s always the very long gradient I try to get rid of.
Since I can’t write my own code and find nothing like this in the internet, would someone please tell me which line of code I need to change to make the gradient shorter?

Thanks for reading!

Not used this library, but I would have thought....
fillSolid for a certain number of LEDs
fillGradient for the middle section
fillSolid for the remainder

Change the startpos and number of LEDs accordingly.