Slipperiness [SOLVED]

Hello all,

This might be a different sort of a question.

How can I measure the slipperiness of a surface using arduino or any other microcontroller?

I want to build a pathway sort of thing which has good tensile strength and is lightweight (Aluminium perhaps? Anything better than this in abundance and is cheap?)

What can I apply on this pathway to make it super slippery, as slippery as possible so that objects just slip through under the force of gravity if the plane is inclined? What inclination angle would I need that would work for all kinds of weights?

Also how can I measure the slipperiness so that more "stuff" can be applied after rains I guess?

Edit Update: Context of use: In a small town, a big family lives in 5 buildings. 3 of them 2 storey high and 2 of them 3 storey high. All of them are owned by the same family and the family runs a set of shops on the ground floor that faces the road side. Particularly a restaurant, a convenience/general store, vegetable and fruit store, a medical store, clothing store and a small supermarket. 1 person from their family approached me as to how can they build a system that allows sharing of stock across buildings. They said they usually stock items on the top most floor and on the terrace. So he asked me whether we can build a conveyor belt to move stuff from lower height buildings to higher height buildings and use a slippery surface to move stuff from higher to lower. For example fresh vegetables and fruits are required in both restaurants and vegetable shop. So there are some common items which are required by 2 or more shops and in order to facilitate easy stocking, can we build a system that allows to move stuff easily across buildings? Weight and material of the item to be moved can be anything, ranging from 10 kg detergent bag to lightweight cotton earbuds. Maybe we can pack all things in a common casing (cardboard or plastic) so that everything is deterministic.

Thanks

I'm sure there are standardised tests for this, do some research. If not standardised it shouldn't be hard to find some examples of test setups that were used to test different surfaces.

Lots of ways to make things "slippery". Lubricants is one. Smooth surfaces another. Teflon (PTFE) is one of the more slippery surfaces, which is why it's used a.o. in non-stick cookware. A superconductor/magnet combination takes away any surface friction.

Note that there are many things that affect friction. The materials, the shape of the two objects in combination with the hardness, the force at which they're held together (be it gravity or otherwise), etc.

How can I measure the slipperiness of a surface

You put an object on an inclined plane and alter the angle until it moves. The lower the angle the more slippy, or the less friction there is between object and plane. This is a first year physics experiment.

You could automate this with a microcomputer but you save little in doing this.

Hi, Precedent posts are completely right. The only thing I'd add: are you going to repeat the experiment many times?: such a case, may be that using an arduino (or whatever measuring/computing system) is reasonable. Or may be you are planning it as a hobbyst/teaching project ... (By the way: to make such an experiment perhaps a spring - force gauge system would be more practical than tilting the surface). Regards.

Grumpy_Mike: You put an object on an inclined plane and alter the angle until it moves. The lower the angle the more slippy, or the less friction there is between object and plane. This is a first year physics experiment.

It usually takes a higher force to get moving than to continue moving. That's why it's sitting there, until it slides off at pretty high speed. For proper measurements a force sensor (strain gauge, load cell) to measure the actual force applied and a linear actuator (for controlled movement) are needed.

wvmarle: It usually takes a higher force to get moving than to continue moving.

Yes but we want a qualitative measure of the lubricating compound not a static strictive measurement.

Both appear important for the requirement of OP (something that's sliding down an inclined surface - presumably from standstill) but admittedly OP didn't give enough details to be sure (nothing new there).

ritesht93: Hello all,

This might be a different weird sort of a question.

How can I measure the slipperiness of a surface using arduino or any other microcontroller?

I want to build a pathway sort of thing which has good tensile strength and is lightweight (Aluminium perhaps? Anything better than this in abundance and is cheap?)

What can I apply on this pathway to make it super slippery, as slippery as possible so that objects just slip through under the force of gravity if the plane is inclined? Is that possible? What inclination angle would I need?

Also how can I measure the slipperiness so that more "stuff" can be applied after rains I guess?

Thanks

to break down the post

1) use of a micro-controller, specifically an Arduino is requested. so that needs to be part of the solution.

2) tensile strength is listed early, so the structure will be under tension in application

disregard abundant and cheap....

3) pathway is not to be made of the materiel to make it slippery.

4) some application onto the high tensile strength structure is desired

5) maximum slip is a goal.

6) gravity is part of the equation

7) the channel is to be inclined

8) it is implied that the application of said materials are expected to wear away

9) outdoor use as it is intended to be rained upon.

10) in conjunction with #1, measurement of effectiveness of said applied material is a goal of the project.

we can immediately rule out an 89.9 degree incline made of Teflon. the applied materials would not stick to it. what we can discuss is the two things that brings this question to the forum. using a microprocessor and measuring things. a specific shape, weight and chemical composition of a thing will traverse the distance of said channel based on the friction between the test block and the surface. the speed of the traverse can be measured the angle can be measured a second test block of other substance with different properties can be used if the test is manual, then a simple timing of test block will meet the requirements. angle measurement, timer, possibly beam-break sensors and an Arduino. as for the second question, "what can I apply" this requires more knowledge about the physical properties of the intended use. feathers would not slip as the weight to friction is too low cement blocks would be much different as would marbles. but that brings us to the question if you are looking for help with the Arduino portion or the testing apparatus. And that in turn brings us to the other details of the assignment. Did your professor list any other parameters ?

Thank you all for your inputs. Updated the question with more context (background and usage)

This has nothing to do with Arduinos, nor electronics. You’re trying to build a set of slides. Stainless steel or lacquered wood all work very well for this. You don’t want to get anywhere near the minimum slope anyway, as you want to be really sure whatever you throw on that slide will make its way to the bottom end.

Ohh ok thanks. Will work it out with a civil engineer.