Smd temt6000 light sensors

Hi guys

So I accidentally bought a few temt6000 light sensors that don't come on a pcb. I guess they are for surface mounting.

Could anyone help me out by suggesting the best way for me to solder cables to an smd these light sensor with a regular soldering iron?

Depends on spacing, tricky , you might be ale to use vero or pad board.

Can you make a pcb

Let me put it this way, I don't know what Vero or pad board is. Ok I looked it up. I do have a pad board. It's a prototype board that came with an Arduino kit.

Depending on the spacing of the chip (i looked it up) you may be able to use blobs of solder to solder it to a pad board. And get wires off it.

OK. I was also thinking of soldering very small gauge copper wire to the sensor and then gluing the wires to an acrylic plate.

could work but i would suggest that if pad board has the appropriate spacing it might be easier

could work but i would suggest that if pad board has the appropriate spacing it might be easier

Ok, I just spent the past 45 minutes soldering thin gauge wire to the 3 pads on the temt6000 light sensor (SMD). Anyway, no need for me to post pictures :-). Let’s assume the wires are soldered just fine.

Looking for the temt6000 light sensor MODULE (which I should’ve bought instead of just the module) I can see that there is a resistor in there. Looking at the schematics I found its a 10K resistor:

temt6000schem.jpg

Im gonna have to set this up on my breadboard for now with a traditional resistor. But I was just wondering about the connections. The sensor has an emitter and a collector that I need to connect. The collector comes from the Vcc side and the emitter goes to ground. The diagram shows the resistor in the GND side.

I just wanted to know why it would go on that side. I remember when working with LEDs that a R is also required and I remember reading once that it doesnt make a difference whether you put it on the + or - of the LED because as long as the R was in the circuit it would do its job.

My setup looks like this:

Screenshot 2016-01-24 11.32.57.png

FullSizeRender (17).jpg

Bump :-)

Looks like your analog input is grounded. That won't work. Have you tried it the way the schematic shows?

Marciokoko: Im gonna have to set this up on my breadboard for now with a traditional resistor. But I was just wondering about the connections. The sensor has an emitter and a collector that I need to connect. The collector comes from the Vcc side and the emitter goes to ground. The diagram shows the resistor in the GND side.

I just wanted to know why it would go on that side. I remember when working with LEDs that a R is also required and I remember reading once that it doesnt make a difference whether you put it on the + or - of the LED because as long as the R was in the circuit it would do its job.

You could put the resistor on the other side; that would work. Either way, you measure the point between the resistor and the sensor. But it would invert the output...

Its an emitter follower which has a voltag gain slightly less than 1 but with low output impedence.

@Paulcet:
“Looks like your analog input is grounded. That won’t work. Have you tried it the way the schematic shows?”

I thought I had wired it as the schematic shows. You mean because I had put the analog pin directly next to ground? So you mean fix it like this:
lightsensorwiring.jpg

@DrAzzy:
“You could put the resistor on the other side…But it would invert the output.”

What do you mean ‘invert’ the output? You mean that if I take the R and put it between Vcc and the Collector, the output would be inverted in what way?

@Boardburner2:
“Its an emitter follower which has a voltag gain slightly less than 1 but with low output impedence.”

what? :frowning:

No, I mean put the yellow wire (signal) on row 10. All you did was move it to another spot on the same row, which is grounded.

Emitter follower AKA common collector. Thats the name where the resistor is in the emitter.

With the resistor in the collector its called common emitter. That gives voltage gain with an inverted output.

Marciokoko:
My setup looks like this:

Screenshot 2016-01-24 11.32.57.png

That fritzing diagram is wrong , the yellow analogue lead is connected to ground not the output of the sensor.

@boardburner2

Thanks. Im still learning to read schematics. I see my mistake. My original wiring and fritzing schematic were congruent with each but wrong because they didnt follow the order of the schematic.

So you mean like this:
RowOrderWiringDoubt.jpg

What about in the breadboard, this is what I came up with:
Screenshot 2016-01-25 16.46.44.png

Im not sure if it makes a difference the order within the row? Iow, does it make a difference if I put:

A. Emitter - Signal - R
B. Emitter - R - Signal

That looks correct , are you sure you understand how the rows/columns are connected in a breadboard ?

One other thing, resistors and diodes normally come with adhesive on the ends.

1/4 in should be cut off them as the adhesive will cause problems for your breadboard over time

Yes I believe I do. Rows are all connected at every pin (1a-1b-1c-1d-1e-1f). To connect rows I need to jump between the 2 rows I wish to connect (1a-2a = 1a-1b-1c-1d-1e-1f-2a-2b-2c-2d-2e-2f).

However my question remains as the order within each row. I think its more a matter of not being able to visualize 3 things connected in a row. If I see the row as a piece of wire and I plug:

1a = emitter 1b = resistor 1c = signal

how does that differ from:

1a = emitter 1b = signal 1c = resistor

As for the 1/4 inch should be cut from resistors and diodes, are you saying i should cut the tips off my resistor?