Smoking

Found this website,

http://www.mez.co.uk/lucas.html

Good for a laugh :smiley:

anyone else?

Oldergeek:
Found this website,

Lucas - Prince of Darkness - Lucas Electrical Humor Jokes

Good for a laugh :smiley:

anyone else?

The replacement fuse section was informative :slight_smile:
But I've seen tinfoil wrapped around a blown fuse! Fire hazard or what?

I would have thought that the 1482 amp slow blow should have been no blow

Pedro147:
I would have thought that the 1482 amp slow blow should have been no blow

I don't think I'll be testing it any time soon. :slight_smile:
Drawing that much current would make my electricity bill beyond my ability to pay it.

Oldergeek:
Lucas - Prince of Darkness - Lucas Electrical Humor Jokes
anyone else?

OMG That brings back memories. Remember the three coil voltage regulators that managed car dynamos. Standard adjustment procedure was to bend the metal bits and hope to get lucky. If, after f*cking up half a dozen batteries it still doesn't work. Throw it away and fit an alternator and don't forget to switch the radio over to the new fangled negative earth setup.

Or having to make a ‘condensor’ from cigarette pack lining foil?

KenF:
OMG That brings back memories. Remember the three coil voltage regulators that managed car dynamos. Standard adjustment procedure was to bend the metal bits and hope to get lucky. If, after f*cking up half a dozen batteries it still doesn't work. Throw it away and fit an alternator and don't forget to switch the radio over to the new fangled negative earth setup.

Are you talking about (the commonly known as) "Delco" regulators? I just adjusted one last week. It's kinda fun popping open a ~40 year old part and seeing how clean it is inside.

That looks like a new improved version of the one I'm familiar with. The ones I recall had a springy clip to hold the cover on. (they needed "asjusting so often that easy access was built in). The springy clip was invariably broken (due to wear from being used so often). First step of the adjustment was to remove the shed spider skins and cobwebs. A small wire brush could then help remove the worst of the rust. Followed by a nail file to clean up the contacts.

You could even get a "special tool" for the adjustment. It was just a tyre wrench with a slot cut in the side. This was used to bend the tags that carry the contacts.