[Solved] Microcontroller not working on breadboard

I’ve been doing some raspberry pi tinkering before and decided to get an Arduino Uno. Everything works fine when my MC is in the arduino, but as soon as I try to wire it on a breadboard, it just doesnt seem to do anything. I’ve tried with external power, power from the arduino, but nothing works.
When I measure the voltage on the connected pins, it does show that they have power. I’ve disassembled about 10 times, tried with 2 different MCs and still nothing works.
I’ve included how it’s currently wired, used to be with jumper cables and that didn’t work either.
I cant even get it to power up to upload a sketch through the TX/RX cables.
Any ideas why it doesn’t work?

Timmy953’s picture:
86faf00d386711b8e03ceb5a8fa93844688d8356.jpg

Did you set the fuses to use the internal oscillator? If you have the chip configured to use an external clock source and you don’t provide one, then it won’t run.

You should also put 0.1 uF capacitors on both the power lines. Some of the tutorials don’t show these, and it is sometimes possible to get by without, but it’s best to use them as it can save you a lot of frustration.

I did connect the crystal before, but that didn't work. This time, I forgot to put capacitors on the crystal and that surprisingly seemed to do the trick.
A lot of stuff I found says that you need a capacitor on the crystals to ground. Is this true? And if so, how big do they need to be (I was using 22µF but apparently that doesnt work).

Also the lowest capacitor I have at home atm is 1µF, will that do for the power line? And do I just connect them from positive to ground on the power rail? Or the actual power feeding into the MC?

Timmy953:
A lot of stuff I found says that you need a capacitor on the crystals to ground. Is this true?

Yes. It is a very tiny amount of capacitance so perhaps the breadboard provides enough to get by without. However, it's best to be safe and always use the recommended capacitors as you might encounter intermittent failures that cause a lot of confusion and frustration.

Timmy953:
nd if so, how big do they need to be (I was using 22µF but apparently that doesnt work).

It should be somewhere around 22 pF.

Timmy953:
Also the lowest capacitor I have at home atm is 1µF, will that do for the power line?

Probably. With capacitors, it's usually a range of values that will work but it's hard to know exactly what that range is so it's easiest just to use the recommended values if possible. When you don't have those values, you can try to get by with what you have on hand.

Timmy953:
And do I just connect them from positive to ground on the power rail? Or the actual power feeding into the MC?

They should be as close as possible to the chip. Like this:


BTW, that picture is from Nick Gammon's excellent tutorial on making a breadboard Arduino:
http://www.gammon.com.au/breadboard

I used two 1ųF capacitors and it seems to work. So far no capacitor needed on the crystal. This is what it looks like now.

Thanks for all the help!

Poor solution. I would prefer to follow the instructions from @pert to prevent further problems.