[Solved] What solid state relay to use for lightbulb

Edit: Problem solved, the 2A 240V SSR can handle 30A inrush for a short period of time: https://www.openhacks.com/uploadsproductos/g3mb-ssr-datasheet.pdf

I want to use an arduino with a solid state relay for controlling two 220V light bulb (maximum 100W each). I have found a module with 2 SSR which can handle 2A(i think each) at 240V(for around 4$) and one for bigger duty which can handle 40A at 380V (8$, but can handle only one input so i'll need two and that means 16$). But from what i know light bulbs when turned on needs a higher intake and i don't know if the 2A will handle it. Which one should i buy?(i don't want to spend much money, also the 40A one is more bigger in size and for me it seems an overkill for just one light bulb).

"Turn on a light bulb" is like saying "need fuel for my car". What type? And jeezz, 100W in this day and age?

But if it's a halogen / incandescent I would not worry about that 2A rating. I would worry about the PCB most of those (assuming something like this). Track placement is just terrible on most. So be warned. The G3MB-202P on it is just fine and actually all you need. Just run 5 through them and they turn on. But note, you can't dim.

septillion:
"Turn on a light bulb" is like saying "need fuel for my car". What type? And jeezz, 100W in this day and age?

But if it's a halogen / incandescent I would not worry about that 2A rating. I would worry about the PCB most of those (assuming something like this). Track placement is just terrible on most. So be warned. The G3MB-202P on it is just fine and actually all you need. Just run 5 through them and they turn on. But note, you can't dim.

It's a normal incandescent bulb, probably i will never plug something more than a 60W one (and most times it will be the 4-5W led ones connected instead) but if someone from my house switch the bulb because it doesn't work anymore i want to be sure that nothing happens (and you can find 100W at stores here, so if by any chance someone try to plug it it would be safe). And yes, that is the SSR i was talking about.
This is the othee SSR i was talking about: https://cdn.sparkfun.com/datasheets/Components/General/SSR40DA.pdf

Mm, I can't buy (at least not normal type) 100W incandescent for almost 10 years... Even more, I can't buy incandescent at all anymore for a couple of years now. All halogen now. Or yeah, LED. But the ones in stores are all crap.

But that 2A type is fine. Can handle 100W with ease. And yes, cold they can draw more but a SSR can handle more for a short period of time as well.

I even think the 2A will work better because they also have something like a minimum current. And the big boy (which can only do 40A with HUGE heat sinks btw) probably will not be happy with 5W leds.

septillion:
Mm, I can't buy (at least not normal type) 100W incandescent for almost 10 years... Even more, I can't buy incandescent at all anymore for a couple of years now. All halogen now. Or yeah, LED. But the ones in stores are all crap.

But that 2A type is fine. Can handle 100W with ease. And yes, cold they can draw more but a SSR can handle more for a short period of time as well.

I even think the 2A will work better because they also have something like a minimum current. And the big boy (which can only do 40A with HUGE heat sinks btw) probably will not be happy with 5W leds.

Thank you. Depend on the country, here in Romania you still find incandescent lights in stores (half my house use incandescence lighting) and usually 40-60-80W (and 100W, but not as used as some years ago). I was afraid of using the 2A SSR because i had read somewhere on this forum that you need at least 2.5A for an incandescent light because they have a short high intake when you turn them on. As on the 40A one in the datasheet it's written that it can take for a short period up to 120A. But the problem is that I didn't found any datasheet for this 2A module so I wasn't been able to verify if it can handle a "burst". But since i didn't hear people complaining about those modules I think they can handle them (assuming there are a lot of people that start their high voltage automation with lights).

Edit: Found the datasheet for the 2A one: https://www.openhacks.com/uploadsproductos/g3mb-ssr-datasheet.pdf
As I can see it can handle an inrush of 30A for a short period of time and that means I can use them without any problem. Thank you for helping.

Damn :smiley: If I turn on all the light in my home I will still stay under 100W :smiley: But I did invest in good quality leds. Philips Dim Tone or Master in livingroom, studie, kitchen etc and Ikea bulbs in pantry, toilet etc.

rumble06:
But the problem is that I didn’t found any datasheet for this 2A module so I wasn’t been able to verify if it can handle a “burst”.

Look again :wink: To quick, you already did :smiley:

Surge current: 30A (60Hz, 1 cycle)

And that is pretty common for semi conductors. Because the biggest problem isn’t the current but the extra heat it produces. And because of thermal mass it’s pretty save to have a surge of a magnitude higher, not problem. Not very scientific but more a hands on explanation :smiley: