Some doubts (3rd party hardware, compatible hardware) (newbie)

Hi,

I'm completely new to this, and since I dont wanna burn/break something I decided to start be part of community so I could learn more and maybe in the future be able to help others too. I'm a programmer, but new to electronics, so I lack the hardware skills. This things fascinates me and I'm trying to get into this scene.

I wanna purchase some sensors, that are Arduino compatible, but my doubt is.. can I use libraries with them after ? because for what I readed in this website, we can install 3rd party hardware but... if the hardware doesnt come with drivers/library, what we can do ? use a 'generic' one ? could work ? Should I try get only Arduino products ?

If I connect the board via usb, to a usb charger adapter (so I can have it plugged in the wall) instead of using the pc.. could burn it ? Should I be carefull with something else ?

Model: Arduino Leonardo

Thanks in advance.

There is an over reliance on libaries which leads to attitudes like yours.
All these are are code some one has written. There is nothing to stop you writing this code yourself.

biscottoesse:
Hi,

I'm completely new to this, and since I dont wanna burn/break something I decided to start be part of community so I could learn more and maybe in the future be able to help others too. I'm a programmer, but new to electronics, so I lack the hardware skills. This things fascinates me and I'm trying to get into this scene.

I wanna purchase some sensors, that are Arduino compatible, but my doubt is.. can I use libraries with them after ? because for what I readed in this website, we can install 3rd party hardware but... if the hardware doesnt come with drivers/library, what we can do ? use a 'generic' one ? could work ? Should I try get only Arduino products ?

In general 5V sensors of all kinds should work with a 5V Arduino - the limitations
are things like power consumption (some devices may require more power than the
Arduino's 5V pin can source, for instance), or bandwidth (you won't be able to anything
directly with a video device for instance).

If a device is simple (LED?) then a library isn't going to do anything useful. Devices
with some complexity are easiest if they come with a library - remember its open source,
you can hack the library if you want, or roll your own.

If I connect the board via usb, to a usb charger adapter (so I can have it plugged in the wall) instead of using the pc.. could burn it ? Should I be carefull with something else ?

USB chargers and USB powered hubs provide regulated 5V power (or they wouldn't
be USB compliant), so will be safe (although avoid anything suspiciously cheap from
eBay). Standard USB provides upto 0.5A, many USB chargers can provide more.

Model: Arduino Leonardo

Thanks in advance.

Grumpy_Mike:
There is an over reliance on libaries which leads to attitudes like yours.
All these are are code some one has written. There is nothing to stop you writing this code yourself.

Absolutely. Although I don't think it's the OPs fault. When there's even a library to debounce button presses....

When it's interfacing to something fairly complex, like an Ethernet adapter or the file system on an SD card then a library is the way to go. Most sensors, though, just require some rudimentary method to access their goodies.

If you are starting out then buy you hardware modules from a supplier who can also point you at the libraries to get you started. As a programmer you will then be able to modify the libraries and / or write your own.

Do use a separate power supply if you can. Your PC USB port is not designed to support loads greater than 500mA which is easily exceeded when you are starting out. I have put a 250mA fuse in my output line.

Above all follow the learning projects on YouTube and buy kits for the projects you want to do.