Speed controller

I can tell for a fact that shorting the bullets will damage the ESC,no question.

@raschemmel thanks! But if I am sending a pulse of 1000us to my ESC it keeps the motor stopped. In this case could I short the bullets? I mean, if for some reason the bullets fell in salt water and they are really close, can this kill the ESC? Cause I think an ESC is really smart, if it is supposed to keep the motor stopped, I think it will not apply any current/voltage on the motor, correct?

Some ESCs have better current protection than others but the answer to your question is yes it SHOULD limit the short circuit current. It makes no difference where the throttle is. If it is protected , it should work at full throttle since a short is most likrly to occur when running it wide open at full throttle. I would avoid letting the bullets touch and I wouldn't worry about salt water.

As far as submerging the brushless motor in salt water, there may be no point in there where bare wires are exposed.

As far as submerging the brushless motor in salt water, there may be no point in there where bare wires are exposed.

It wouldn't matter. A BLDC motor will work just fine submerged in saltwater. It should be rinsed with DI water at least once a day though.

Thank you all! Good to know my ESC will not burn if I use it in salt water and clean it with DI. In fact I expected that cause I have an aeroboat and sometimes the 3 wires that goes to the motor and the motor fell upside down and were submerged for at least 2 or 3 minutes and I had no damage. However if the ESC gets wet it does not work anymore.

He didn't say your ESC will work in salt water. He said your BLDC motor will work in salt water.

To wit:

I can think of no electronic explanation for brushless motor ESC output leads submerged in saltwater damaging the ESC (assuming the esc is nowhere near the water)

huuummmmm

Just to be clear. The proximity of the ESC to the water is irrelevant. The only important factor is how well the ESC is protected from the water. (conformal coating , waterproof housing etc.)

Yes, putting any bare metal with voltage present in contact with salt water is going to rather quickly damage the metal.

From what the OP says, the saltwater doesn't seem to damage the motor. Maybe he rinses off the saltwater at the end of the day before storing the boat.

Mark T has already made a comment i agree with.

Its possible to recover the electronics etc with a quick wash and displacement.

What may be not obvious is the bearing damage.
Even a short spell of water can dramatically reduce bearing life.
Particles of rust are abrasive.

If it dunked in salt , wash immediately with fresh , preferably distilled water.

Then use a water displacing liquid, wd40 , dunk in isopropyl etc.

DO NOT use acetone, at a pinch kerosene may do for a short time but definitely not ideal.

In the model world motors have short intermittent use and may survive with proper care.

In the industrial world water can be very destructive.

Even a short spell of water can dramatically reduce bearing life.
Particles of rust are abrasive.

The motor is on a model boat. The boat is only in the water during the day and then the motor is washed at the end of the day. Rust does not form in one day , especially on a boat that is in motion. I do not agree that bearing life is substantially reduced by submerging the motor in salt water for several hours.
If the motor is flushed with DI water, then IPA, then WD40 at the end of the day, it can be last years.

raschemmel:
The motor is on a model boat. The boat is only in the water during the day and then the motor is washed at the end of the day. Rust does not form in one day , especially on a boat that is in motion. I do not agree that bearing life is substantially reduced by submerging the motor in salt water for several hours.
If the motor is flushed with DI water, then IPA, then WD40 at the end of the day, it can be last years.

I have an old ic boat engine that destroyed its crank bearings in a matter of weeks after a couple of sea dunkings.

Much higher impulse load on those though.

Rust can form in a day but you may not see it.

Another member has a boat engine(electric) which had siezed , now runs with some vibration, rust is visible along with flakes of chrome (under a microscope).

I would expect more modern brushless motors to have ss bearings though.

raschemmel:
Rust does not form in one day.

I guess you missed that chemistry lesson. YES IT DOES

Neither of the cases cited specified that the parts were flushed as I described when the boat was removed from the water. I doubt that they were. I have inspected brushless motors used in salt water before flushing them after several hours use in saltwater and no rust was visible BEFORE flushing as described. I have no doubt that rust can form in a day but I doubt that it forms on stainless steel. In any case, as I said, no rust was observed, despite your claims that it must form. No doubt the motors were not flushed after use as I described. Moreover, the OP has already stated that his brushless motor has not shown any signs after several YEARS of use in saltwater because HE flushed his motor as I described. If you haven't done it , then you don't know what you're talking about. Using a motor is saltwater and FAILING to flush it after each use will CERTAINLY destroy it. I've never owned any boats but I have had model aircraft crash in water that comes from the bay and the motor was fine after cleaning. I am taking the OP's word about his motor being fine after several years of use when rinsed after each use. The key is that when the motor is rinsed, it must be run in the rinsing fluid to thoroughly clean it. It will not rinse completely if it is simply dunked in the water , not spinning. It needs to be spun in the cleaning solutions. This discussion is really academic anyway because the OP has already stated he hasn't had any issues. Debating chemistry in this case is pointless if you have never gone through the cleaning procedure yourself and actually examined the motor with your own eyes after cleaning it.

raschemmel:
The motor is on a model boat. The boat is only in the water during the day and then the motor is washed at the end of the day.

That may be the problem.

My model would take considerable time to disassemble and get at the motor.

I certainly would not want to do that every trip.

Rust does not form in one day

I have no doubt that rust can form in a day

Steel will rust after one short shower of rain, and that's not even salty. The marine environment is
unremittingly harsh for most metals and a motor will not survive saltwater, it will be damaged. The
protective paint on the stator laminations may slow down the initial attack, but the salt will get in.
The bearings will be corroded, its all doomed, even the copper in the windings will be destroyed
eventually as the insulation is not fully impermeable to water and salt.

I've discovered plastic bearings - might solve part of the problem:

http://www.bj-xlbearings.com/anti-corrosion_plastic_bearings.htm

The OP say's he has a way to easily submerge the motor and run it in the cleaning solution in a matter of minutes. No disassemby required.

Steel will rust after one short shower of rain, and that's not even salty. The marine environment is
unremittingly harsh for most metals and a motor will not survive saltwater, it will be damaged. The
protective paint on the stator laminations may slow down the initial attack, but the salt will get in.
The bearings will be corroded, its all doomed, even the copper in the windings will be destroyed
eventually as the insulation is not fully impermeable to water and salt.

You can repeat that till you're blue in the face and it isn't going to deter a determined hobbyist who wants to run his boat every day in the summer. The cleaning regime is a small price to pay for the fun derived from almost any RC hobby. I must admit, I haven't got into boats yet but if I did I would do what the OP does and not worry about the rust. I would just run it until it stops and buy another. That's how it works.

"You pays your money and you takes your chances...."