Split Encoder signal "Y"

hi all.

i just wonder is it possible and logic to Split a Encoder(A, B) signal like a "Y" cable.

or is it better to use some kind of IC that also amplifies the signal???

i'm asking this because i have a project with a Arduino and a "SICK" encoder and i just love it but they are not realy cheap(project runs realy fine). but maby in the future i like to add more arduinos that needs feedback from the encoder.

so i would like to use the same encoder.

spirit: or is it better to use some kind of IC that also amplifies the signal???

How would you amplify a digital signal? :astonished:

spirit: I just wonder is it possible and logic to Split a Encoder(A, B) signal like a "Y" cable.

Clearly you can connect the encoder to more than one thing; as you say, you just connect the lines in parallel.

You would have the common ground of all the devices involved connected, and it would be necessary to ensure they were all running from the same (5V) power supply as if one was switched off, it would be pulling its input lines to ground and they would then not read correctly on the other devices. There are ways - such as using opto-isolators - to deal with a situation where they did not have a common ground.

SICK make a lot of different encoders, some digital, some analog some both... Perhaps some details would be good?

How would you amplify a digital signal?

Sorry :-[ i'm just new with electronics.

but i though if you split a signal like digital it needs a 2.5V to get a logic "1" and if i split the siginal (as example) 100 times i dont get to the 2.5v For a logic "1" any more.

and as i do allot with "DMX protocol, RS485 (Lighting)" its also digital singal still if you like to Split the signal you need a Spliiter/Booster. otherwise you have the change your lights getting a life of there own.

Clearly you can connect the encoder to more than one thing; as you say, you just connect the lines in parallel

Thanks!

the "SICK" encoder has it own Gnd and 5+ , i dont need pullup resistors. so when it happins it will get its own power supply and i will use a commen GND or as you sad a opto isolator.

EDIT: its the BFS60B with A_, A¯, B_, B¯, Sine+, Sine-, Cosine+, Cosine-, GND, 5V and i use A_, B_, GND, 5V

Many thanks for making my life easyer :-D

OK, so with digital signals, the term is "buffer" - the voltage is not amplified but the buffer device can supply much more current than the original.

Similarly for analog signals, which it sounds like you may have here. I cannot find a BFS60B on the "SICK" website, so I have no more to offer.

OK, so with digital signals, the term is "buffer" - the voltage is not amplified but the buffer device can supply much more current than the original.

ahhh learn everyday more ;)

I cannot find a BFS60B on the "SICK" website, so I have no more to offer.

https://www.mysick.com/eCatSEO.aspx?go=DataSheet&Cat=Row&At=Fa&Cult=German&ProductID=89042&Category=Produktfinder

Most encoders are simply switches. So when they produce a "HIGH" it's by switching the 5v to the relevant output. I can't imagine a single scenario where you'd want that encoder to have it's output split to multiple inputs though. What did you have in mind?