SSR Help

I want to use this SSR for a project:

S202S02F
http://www.sharpsma.com/webfm_send/304

Their are a few things I don’t understand on the data sheet. Like this:

When making the transition from On to Off state, a snubber circuit should be used ensure that sudden drops
in current are not accompanied by large instantaneous changes in voltage across the Triac.
This fast change in voltage is brought about by the phase difference between current and voltage.
Primarily, this is experienced in driving loads which are inductive such as motors and solenoids.
Following the procedure outlined above should provide sufficient result

I am going to drive motors, but it will just be an occasional on/off (couple of times a day), not PWM or anything. I don’t know if I need that snubber circuit, or what it is exactly. I am using these motors:

Eheim 1260 universal pump
http://www.eheim.com/files/image/file/INSTRUCTION%20MANUALS/universal_1260_1262_3260_3264.pdf

OM Squirt
http://www.oceansmotions.com/store/product_info.php?products_id=34&osCsid=10abfe59659b839a5dc23c738ee11f2d
I can’t find specifications for this motor, but it is very low speed (1rpm) 110V AC.

I would also like to use them on these LED drivers:

Mean Well ELN-60-48P
http://www.meanwell.com/search/eln-60/eln-60-spec.pdf
I will use Arduino PWM pins for daylight simulation, but I guess you are still supposed to turn them off with SSR or relay at night (rather than try and dim close to 0 with PWM)

The second question; I don’t understand this graph on spec sheet:
Fig.2 RMS ON-state Current vs.
Ambient Temperature

I would like to use these SSR without heatsinks. Each one would be switching <1 amp. Does that look like it will work, or will I still need a small heatsink?

jvdb:
Their are a few things I don’t understand on the data sheet. Like this:

When making the transition from On to Off state, a snubber circuit should be used ensure that sudden drops
in current are not accompanied by large instantaneous changes in voltage across the Triac.
This fast change in voltage is brought about by the phase difference between current and voltage.
Primarily, this is experienced in driving loads which are inductive such as motors and solenoids.
Following the procedure outlined above should provide sufficient result

I am going to drive motors, but it will just be an occasional on/off (couple of times a day), not PWM or anything. I don’t know if I need that snubber circuit, or what it is exactly.

http://www.lmgtfy.com/?q=snubber+circuit
Yes, I would recommend the snubber. Start with the recommended values in the paragraph above, then test. If it works (it probably will) go with it. If you have unusual actions, (motor doesn’t start or doesn’t stop) post back here.

I would also like to use them on these LED drivers:

Mean Well ELN-60-48P
http://www.meanwell.com/search/eln-60/eln-60-spec.pdf

The SSR will work. Probably will not need a snubber.

The second question; I don’t understand this graph on spec sheet:
Fig.2 RMS ON-state Current vs.
Ambient Temperature

I would like to use these SSR without heatsinks. Each one would be switching <1 amp. Does that look like it will work, or will I still need a small heatsink?

You would look at line 6 (without heatsink). If 1 amp (on the vertical axis of the graph) is under the line at your ambient temperature, it’s good. (In other words, your <1 amp will be fine up to about 80°C)

Paulcet:
http://www.lmgtfy.com/?q=snubber+circuit
Yes, I would recommend the snubber. Start with the recommended values in the paragraph above, then test. If it works (it probably will) go with it. If you have unusual actions, (motor doesn’t start or doesn’t stop) post back here.

Haha. I didn’t think it would be that easy. I had googled snubber circuit, but found stuff that was way more complicated than just resistor and capacitor. Thanks.

You would look at line 6 (without heatsink). If 1 amp (on the vertical axis of the graph) is under the line at your ambient temperature, it’s good. (In other words, your <1 amp will be fine up to about 80°C)

Makes sense now, I was thinking that graph was temp of SSR, not ambient. I need to read more closely.