Standalone Arduino

I'm just getting into arduino, and I wanted to start moving projects to an individual chip. I'm using a MEGA 2560 board, but that's all I've got. I've got USB-Serial converter if that's of any use.
I just want to get my projects onto a single chip, so I don't have to buy a new arduino for every project.
I could buy a USBasp quite cheap, I guess that's what I'd have to do?
Any help greatly appreciated :%

The closet thing to a single chip may be the Ardweeny kit from Solarbotics.

They are cheap and I've used them successfully.

Why not just use an Atmega328 with its internal 8MHz oscillator? http://arduino.cc/en/Tutorial/ArduinoToBreadboard

I believe you can buy 328s with the bootloader already installed.

...R

Johnny5385 wants to leave them in his project. He still needs the other parts and package the results. I still suggest the Ardweeny or the Pro-Mini clones available on eBay for $6 a piece.

Johnny5385 wants to leave them in his project. He still needs the other parts and package the results. I still suggest the Ardweeny or the Pro-Mini clones available on eBay for $6 a piece.

I'm not sending him to China... not when Newark/Farnell can supply the raw chip. He has a Mega to use for installing the bootloader.

An 8MHz ATmega328P-PU only requires a uC and bypass capacitors, a reset button, and a couple of 1K resistors.

Follow Nick's link, the naked chip is not difficult.

Ray

It all depends on how many projects you intend to build. If a $50 investment in tools and parts is acceptable, it makes sense to go DIY. If not, buy a cheap dev board whenever you need it.

An existing Arduino is an acceptable ICSP programmer. You'll need an FTDI cable if you want to program your boards through typical means (Arduino IDE to a raw chip with bootloader, over serial). That's about $20-30. Crystals and caps are cheap, and the raw chips are a few bucks apiece. You're down to preferences on substrate (breadboard, stripboard, PCB...) and power supply options (DC barrel connectors or 9v clips, diodes, electrolytic caps, LM7805...), which are easy to build and covered adequately.

IMO, if you're going to enter this hobby and build circuits you want to keep, you owe it to yourself to build a few standalone boards just as a rite of passage. But there's a tool for every job, and throwaway boards have their place.

Roll your own - poetic license:

http://www.instructables.com/id/Build-A-FLAT-duino/

Ray