Standalone Arduino

Hey,

Yeah, I know this topic has been covered 1000 times her, but I like my standalone arduino. It gives the option of mounting an Atmega328p in the board, or in a socket, or in a ZIF socket, or a combination of female sockets and male sockets. My next step will be to add FTDI pins so I can program in-circuit.

Sorry, I don't have a schematic, but it should make sense. AS I am a home etcher, and hate jumpers, and find it difficult to do 2 sided boards, there were some compromises.

Mistake on the txt. The voltage in says 5 volts. Should be 7-12 volts in as there is a 5 volt regulator.

And now, the board porn.

Also, I learned a great etching method using vinegar, hydrogen peroxide, and salt mixture. It takes a bit longer than Ferric Chloride, but alot cleaner if you spill 3 gallons of it (don't ask).

(don't ask) - I like that! Looks pretty good.

Going to use it for analog? Add 0.1uF cap to Aref. Or if there is one, add a Cap to AVcc.
Do not connect Aref to 5V, it should only have cap to Gnd.

Suggest moving the Red LED and its resistor to the right to free up access to pins 1,2,3 - 0.1uF cap from DTR to pin 1, and Rx,Tx on 2,3.
Then all FTDI pins can be under the lower left cap.

Most of the people here know how to run a standalone 328.
And when they do they go off to the 644 or 1284.

But nice anyway.

I'd read the vinegar, hydrogen peroxide, and salt mixture method somewhere. How long did it take? And how did you apply toner?

Thanks Crossroads,

I never thought about th Aref, as I have never used it. I'll be sure to make your suggestions so, in version 9.1. .1.4.8.9.1.4.7.3.98.

Yeah, the vinegar thing works great! It really helps if you have a circuit board with a ground plane, as that keeps the amount of copper to be etched to a minimum. It took about 20 minutes to etch this board.

I also take it a step further, and flux the whole board, and file some solder dust with a solder slug and "tin" the entire board. This helps with cheap chinese 1oz boards in that it gives a bit of "heat sink" when soldering, and also keeps the copper from oxidizing. Here's a pic of the back of the board.

Sorry CrossRoads, forgot to mention the Toner. I print on thick magazine paper, and iron on. Sounds goofy, but it works just as well as that overpriced toner transfer paper sold in the US. I heat the board 1st, then apply the printed paper. Then I work the iron from center to edge for about 2-3 minutes, soak in water, and remove the toner with Acetone. Works PERFECT!

Thanks Janost, for your oh so belittling response.

Yes, most people here know how to make a standalone Arduino, but some of us may be just starting to learn about microcontrollers, and how to use them. (as I am, after 46 years).

I just hope your knowledge of such is as big as your ego!. Give us little guys a chance to brag a bit when we figure something out!.

Cheers, mate!

wbegg:
Thanks Janost, for your oh so belittling response.

Yes, most people here know how to make a standalone Arduino, but some of us may be just starting to learn about microcontrollers, and how to use them. (as I am, after 46 years).

I just hope your knowledge of such is as big as your ego!. Give us little guys a chance to brag a bit when we figure something out!.

Cheers

Its not about the ego.
The 328 doesn't even need a circuitboard.

Just cross the Vcc, Avcc and the Gnd pins on the chip and its a standalone Arduino.

The Uno/Dumilanove board is just an extension of the chip pins.

Yes, the bootloader.
If you cant handle that there are preprogrammed (Adaboot/Optiboot) chips to buy.

The Arduino board is really just a board with a chip on it.

You can get stuff called "liquid tin" I think, should give similar result as flowing solder all over the board.

1 oz copper is pretty standard.

Thanks CrossRoads,

Yeah, I looked into the "liquid Tin" thing. A bit expensive for home etched boards. The light dusting of solder slug works for me. I actually thought about devising a solder bath (dip) type thing to tin my boards. My ADHD took me elsewhere.

Yes, 1 oz copper is standard, but 1 oz chinese copper clad boards (at least the person I bought from) are riddled with pits and the traces pull up with the slightest solder heat. I have better quality boards on the way.

Its not about the ego.
The 328 doesn't even need a circuitboard.

Just cross the Vcc, Avcc and the Gnd pins on the chip and its a standalone Arduino.

WOW, So I don't need a Crystal, or a 5v power supply, or anything! Not even a circuit board!?. Wow. So all I have to do is solder wires straight to the chip? Holy Cow, that makes things ALOT easier!

And yes, I buy virgin chips, and burn my own bootloader. I've made a guitar pickup winder, a BBQ PID fan temp controller, and a web based home security system with the 328. I posted this to encourage young starters to make their own. We can't all be as smart as you.

You heard it. All you have to do is solder the 5v, gnd, and reference pin together, and it will WORK. No circuit board required. Who needs digital/analog IO anyway?

Yes.
And what it has to do with analog reference, I have no idea.
Tell me exactly what to do with the Aref pin?

So why are you on this forum??

wbegg:
So why are you on this forum??

Please stop trying to pick a fight.

Nice job wbegg. I too have had a go at a bit of home PCB manufacture although I stayed "on the dark side" and used ferric chloride ]:slight_smile: Isn't it great when you finally try it for the first time and your board actually works. Here is a photo of my home etched minimal Arduino board for interest and also the Iteadstudio miniscuino that had FTDI connection as well. You also sound possibly like a fellow Aussie?

Home etched minimal Arduino (Small).jpg

I agree. Nice job @wbegg. Thank you for sharing.

Good project, i made my standalone too: GrcDuino - Grcbyte

After drilling your board and then applying solder to traces (before adding the parts) place the board in hot oil about 400oF to reflow it.
Gives a nice brilliant finish.