Step Up Module got fried

Hi
Today I fried two off my Step Up Modules (Like this one: http://bit.ly/2vh4DxO). I tried to boost 12V to 24V to power a mini humidifier. The current that flows is very close to the maximum limit, although it worked with a 12V pb battery (was about 12.50V). So I thought it would also work with a 12V PSU. But it couldn't keep up the 24V and made something like a very high hum noise. After about 10 seconds a Chip on the step up module went up in smoke and fire. The MOSFET (IRF540N) also got very hot. After that I thought it could be just a faulty module and connected another step up module directly to the 12V power source. This one went ip in flames even faster. I'm curious about the reason why this module works on a 12V battery, but not on a 12V PSU. Maybe somebody of you could guess why this happened. Thank you for your help.

More details:
PSU rated at 12V @10A

Battery ~12.5V

Humidifier works fine on a 24V power source and uses about 0.6A. It is rated for AC and DC. The MOSFET stays very cool.

Step up modules have an input current limit, that you may not exceed. Consult the chip data sheet.

To produce 24V at 0.6A requires 12V at more than 1.2 A, taking into account conversion efficiency.

PSU? Which one?

Hi,
Welcome to the Forum.

Please read the first post in any forum entitled how to use this forum.
http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php/topic,148850.0.html

A picture or link to your 12V PSU would help, thanks.

Tom... :slight_smile:

After that I thought it could be just a faulty module and connected another step up module directly to the 12V power source

Did you have anything connected to the output of the boost module for this test?

Check the polarity of your input connections.

jremington:
Step up modules have an input current limit, that you may not exceed. Consult the chip data sheet.

To produce 24V at 0.6A requires 12V at more than 1.2 A, taking into account conversion efficiency.

He said it works on a battery, and breaks on the power supply. I think it's more likely to be miswiring than an out of spec design.

More details:
PSU rated at 12V @10A

That's a DC power supply, right? The humidifier may work with AC, but the DC-DC converter won't.

And... If you're using a power supply, get a 24V power supply (or a 24V transformer, since it will work on AC). A DC-DC voltage booster makes sense if you're stuck with a battery, but if you're using a power supply just use the right power supply. :wink:

Thank you very much for your fast replies. I will post a picture of the power supply as soon as i’m home.

Jiggy-Ninja:
Did you have anything connected to the output of the boost module for this test?

Check the polarity of your input connections.He said it works on a battery, and breaks on the power supply. I think it’s more likely to be miswiring

Yes, I conmected the humidifier for this test and also double checked the polarity.
I know it would probably would have be better to test it with another load. But I have to add, that I also use this step up module for a PC fan on the same Power supply (Draws lower current).

jremington:
Step up modules have an input current limit, that you may not exceed. Consult the chip data sheet.

To produce 24V at 0.6A requires 12V at more than 1.2 A, taking into account conversion efficiency.

Like Jiggy-Ninja said it works with a 12V Battery. But it is close to the maximum rating, you’re right.

DVDdoug:
That’s a DC power supply, right? The humidifier may work with AC, but the DC-DC converter won’t.

And… If you’re using a power supply, get a 24V power supply (or a 24V transformer, since it will work on AC). A DC-DC voltage booster makes sense if you’re stuck with a battery, but if you’re using a power supply just use the right power supply. :wink:

Sorry if I have not said it clearly. The humidifier works on AC and DC current. But thank you for your explication :).

TomGeorge:
Hi,
Welcome to the Forum.

Please read the first post in any forum entitled how to use this forum.
http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php/topic,148850.0.html

A picture or link to your 12V PSU would help, thanks.

Tom… :slight_smile:

I hope I have done nothing wrong. If so, please tell me and I try to make it better. I hope my english is not that bad and that you understand what I want to say. I’m from switzeland and still learning english in school^^.

Thank you again for your help. You have a really nice community:)

UPDATE
I’m home and added pictures from my power supply. I also should mention that the power supply works fine on a 3D Printer.





I also added a few pictures of my project, if you’re interested in for what I’m using this humidifier. It’s a Project that I’m working on for my graduation. The project is an automated greenhouse using a combination of an Arduino Mega, an Arduino Uno and a Raspberry Pi controlling irrigation, roof, fans and the humidifier:).

That doesn't help. We don't care about the bird's eye view of your rats nest.

Since it works with a battery and the humidifier, and it works with power supply and fan, the problem is obviously with the combination of power supply + humidifier. Maybe the power supply can't handle the inrush current and is browning out or something causing the module to overdraw input current, I don't know.

Ditch the module. You have two options.

  1. Get a 24V supply so you don't need to use a boost converter.

  2. Get a beefier boost converter.

One option...... avoid using a device that operates close to its limits. Or..... add a cooling system if possible to cool whatever is overheating.

Also... measure with a scope... the voltage output under load.... to check out the behaviour of the supplied voltage.