Stepper driver overheating

I bought a bunch of these nice and cheap (£2) from ebay:

They work perfectly fine for my smaller 0.8A steppers, but I have one 2A stepper which I need to drive. This driver only does 2Amp single bridge max, and so overheats within 15 seconds.

I am struggling to find a stepper driver that isn't £40+ which will drive it.

Is it possible to link two of these up (in parallel) to power the stepper?

The L298 is a very poor choice for driving a stepper motor.

Post a link to the datasheet for your stepper motor.

…R
Stepper Motor Basics
Simple Stepper Code

Poor choice but works flawlessly for what I need, untill I needed to drive a larger stepper.

I have now found a TB6600 selling for £7 which will do up to 4A.

JoeyJoe:
I bought a bunch of these nice and cheap (£2) from ebay:

They work perfectly fine for my smaller 0.8A steppers, but I have one 2A stepper which I need to drive. This driver only does 2Amp single bridge max, and so overheats within 15 seconds.

I am struggling to find a stepper driver that isn't £40+ which will drive it.

Is it possible to link two of these up (in parallel) to power the stepper?

You are trying to drive current-controlled steppers with a voltage drive, rather than a current
drive, and it isn't likely to work.

Tell us exactly which steppers you are talking about - in particular what's the winding resistance?

I think you've just moved from high impedance winding motor to a low-impedance motor, thinking
that will give more power and will work from constant voltage motor driver - no, it doesn't work like that.

Thanks. It does seem to work fine on smaller steppers.

A 2.1 ohm motor driven from 12V is going to pull 6A or so, which would explain the complete
failure of the 298!

With a low impedance motor like this you need a constant current driver like the TB6600, not a motor shield.

You can then run it much faster, using a higher supply voltage.

MarkT:
A 2.1 ohm motor driven from 12V is going to pull 6A or so, which would explain the complete
failure of the 298!

With a low impedance motor like this you need a constant current driver like the TB6600, not a motor shield.

You can then run it much faster, using a higher supply voltage.

Thanks, I've ordered two TB6600's. I wanted to buy these before but they seem to be expensive until I went to banggood.