Stepper Motor Control

Hello, this is my first post ever!

Well, I’m amazed by the capabilities of Arduino, and I wanted to make sure I get the best of it. I’ll be controlling this motor (http://motion.schneider-electric.com/downloads/datasheets/34_mtr.pdf, the M3424-6.3) with this driver (http://www.geckodrive.com/g213v.html) and an Arduino attached. Right now I’m thinking about an Arduino UNO. I’ve read about how should I control this system, but I’m kind of overwhelmed by the amount of information. So I wanted to ask you if you have any advice I could take in the course of this project. I’ve seen the connections of this motor with other drivers, but they have different names (for example). Also, for this motor which way should i use to generate the pulses in your experience.

I also wanted to know what would happen if I energized this motor with the rated Voltage por maximum performance (75 VDC) and less Current (Anything below the 6.5 Amp phase).

That’s all I have for now. I’m a mechanical engineer, and my first job was the motor selection. Now the control of it is my main concern and I hope to buy the rest of elements this week, and work them out according to your advice.

I really appreciate your help!

Need a SITREP (Mil-Speak for Situation Report)
what have you done so far with your hardware ?
It sounds like you don’t have an arduino yet (GET AN UNO ! DON’T THINK ABOUT IT. JUST DO IT. YOU’LL THANK ME LATER.)

Hello and thanks for the response!

Well, this is a subsystem of a bigger machine that is supposed to lift bricks and rocks in an hypothetic construction field. As it is, my funds come from my University, so I haven't bought any of the componentes, because I want to make sure I've got the right components. So! The situation report right now is: I'm getting everything together, so I can build the best system with the budget I have (Being University funds I cannot mess up!), but I know what I need to get things completed. The references of the motor and driver are quasi-selected, as well as an adecquate power source. The part I'm lacking is how will Arduino assemble effectively with the rest of the system.

I would strongly recommend you get one of these:

You can control the backlight (on/off) like this:

void setup()
{
int backLT=10;
pinMode(backLT,OUTPUT);
 digitalWrite(backLT, HIGH);
delay(300);
digitalWrite(backLT, LOW);
  digitalWrite(backLT, HIGH);
delay(300);
digitalWrite(backLT, LOW); 
 
}

That code just blinks the backlight twice quickly so you can indicate some state using flash codes ; 2 blinks= whatever.
(like data received etc…)

I also wanted to know what would happen if I energized this motor with the rated Voltage por maximum performance (75 VDC) and less Current (Anything below the 6.5 Amp phase).

By far the best investment you can make is a good adjustable current dc power supply with the voltage you need. I say this because I know from 30 yrs as a technician, that a good power supply will allow you to try anything you want without blowing stuff up. It will save your ass when you make a mistake. Have you looked yet or does the university have one you can use ?

That's a very hefty motor but at least you seem to have identified a suitable driver.

You need to be aware that it only takes 3 volts to put the max 6.3amps through the motor coils of that motor (0.5 ohm resistance) so you need to ensure that the stepper driver is set to an appropriate current limit.

Higher voltages are used with stepper motors to increase their high speed torque. While 3v will provide the full current in a stationary motor as the speed builds up the inductance of the coils slows the rise in current. Using a higher voltage forces the current to reach it's maximum more quickly. Its probably a case of suck-it-and-see to find the appropriate voltage for your application.

Lowering the max current will directly reduce the torque of the motor. If you don't need the full torque perhaps it would be cheaper to get a different motor.

...R

this is a subsystem of a bigger machine that is supposed to lift bricks and rocks in an hypothetic construction field.

Its probably a case of suck-it-and-see to find the appropriate voltage for your application.

Here is an "Initial Setup Profiling" technique you can use to " to find the appropriate voltage for your application".
Use a variable adjustable current power supply rated for 75V/10A

  1. Set the voltage to 3V
    2./current to some a starting point
    3 Try to lift a known test weight representing the bricks.
  2. Observe & Record results
  3. Increase current by 0.5A, repeat steps 4 & 5 until at maximum Rating for motor & driver.
  4. Repeat steps 2-5 until current at maximum Rating for motor & driver.
    7.. Increase Voltage by 5V
  5. Repeat steps 2-7 until at maximum Rating for motor & driver.
  6. Graph results in Excel