Stepper running

So I have my steppers running. I am just learning how to run them for a project I have in mind. But I am finding they have a lot of vibration. Is that normal for stepper motors?

Thanks.

Yes.

jremington:
Yes.

I was afraind of that. Is there any way to minimize it, or do I just live with it?

Thanks

You can use a microstepping driver to reduce vibration, and also avoid resonances (at certain speeds).

Stepper Motor Basics
Simple Stepper Code

...R

Thanks everyone. Seems microstepping is what I will have to use for one of the applications I want to apply this all too.

Again, many thanks for the concise to the point information.

Picked up some A4988 controllers a while back and hooked them up. Only question I have is can I use the USB connected to my computer as the power supply for the Arduino, or do I need a separate power source.

ov10fac:
Picked up some A4988 controllers a while back and hooked them up. Only question I have is can I use the USB connected to my computer as the power supply for the Arduino, or do I need a separate power source.

You can certainly power the Arduino that way. But there must be a separate power supply for the stepper motors.

...R

Steppers without microstepping have appauling noise and vibration, that's why they are not driven that way any more. [ in industry ]

MarkT:
Steppers without microstepping have appauling noise and vibration, that's why they are not driven that way any more. [ in industry ]

I know that a certain member of the Forum is regularly criticized for his blunt remarks but there is not need to bring him in to this :slight_smile:

...R

Thanks for the responses. "appauling" must be an inside joke? Anyway, yes I know I need a separate power supply for the motor, and I experienced the noise and vibration which is the reasons for my first post and switching motor controllers.

So if you need two separate power sources, one for the motor and one for the Arduino, what do most people do? Seems wasteful to use two separate power supplies for a project? Is there a way to power all three components, Arduino, controller and motor with the same power supply?

Thanks.

You can power the Arduino and the motors from the same power supply provided there is no attempt to draw the motor power through the Arduino. However there will be a lot of electrical noise caused by the motors and rather than create a complex isolating/smoothing circuit for the Arduino it may be simpler to power it separately.

If you need communication with the PC then powering the Arduino from the USB cable seems very straightforward.

...R

My goal is to build a “black box” that will control a stepper motor for a fishing rod wrapping lathe. The motor needs to be able to do the following:

  • Simple on/off switch (if I use two power supplies I will need to be able to switch both on or off with the same switch).

  • Rotate CW and CCW by simply a button press.

  • Speed needs to be set in two ways. First with a pot to set the max rotation speed, then a switch or button to allow the speed to be further controlled with a foot pedal similar to a wow wow used for guitars. The switch wil be used to allow me to choose whether or not the foot pedal is active. If the pedal is not active the motor will rotate based solely on the position of the potentiaometer (I call this mode the direct mode). The foot pedal will allow me to speed up or slow down the rotation to the max speed set by the pot. This speed control is important when winding the line guides on the rod.

  • The black box needs to be fairly small, so my goal is to build the electronics into the box and use external power supplies that are simply plugged into the box. Hence the reason I really only want to use a single power supply. The other option I guess is to use an internal battery pack to power the Arduino. I’m thinking if I have to I can use hearing aid batteries or something similar. Again, one switch to turn power on for both the Arduino and the motor controller/motor.

  • The motor will also simply plug into the box so I can use the box on different lathes powered by similar motors.

I currently use gear motors to do this, either 12 or 24 volts and it is a very simple build. I get gearmotors that have a top speed of anywhere from 500-1000 RPM. For the requirements listed above they are just fine. I just use a simple DC motor controller which is a pwm speed controller, then a few switched (DPDT and SPDT) to accomplish the other functions.

But, the one thing I want to be able to do, that the simple gear motor can’ do, is to step the rod to the 45 degree location and stop, then to the 90 degree and stop etc. The other thing I need it to do is to rotate 180 degrees and stop for 30 seconds, then rotate 180 degrees and stop for another 30 seconds. Do this 10 times, then change the delay to 40 seconds for 10 more rotations, then change delay to 50 seconds etc, etc etc for about an hour to two hours. This is a technique I use when I am rotating the rod while epoxy finish on the guide wraps cures. These last two functions must be controlled with buttons or switches.

So I need the box to contain: the Arduino (I am planning on a nano), the motor controller, the A4988. Both of these are very small and will fit nicely inside a small plastic box I am planning on using. Then the switches I am considering are the simple press type switches I’ve seen used almost everywhere. Like the reset switch on the Arduino itself. One to control the CW/CCW rotation, one to control where the pedal is used or not, one to change to the 45 degree mode and rotate the rod 45 degrees, and then a fourth to start the last function. And lastly the pot and the wiring harness that will provide power/control to the motors, Arduino, and the motor controller.

So a lot of things to do, and a lot of coding, but then I’v been coding for the better part of 50 years so that should not be a problem. Its the electronics that are my problem right now.

So now that I’ve pontificated for a while…

Again, many thanks to everyone for their help, ideas and guidance. This is really a lot of fun.

If I was trying to run my Arduino from my motor power supply I would use a 7805 voltage regulator IC to give me 5v to power the Arduino through its 5v pin.

If you are enclosing everything in a small box you may need to find some way to dissipate the heat from the motor.

...R

Robin2:
If I was trying to run my Arduino from my motor power supply I would use a 7805 voltage regulator IC to give me 5v to power the Arduino through its 5v pin.

If you are enclosing everything in a small box you may need to find some way to dissipate the heat from the motor.

...R

Thanks for the idea. The only components inside the box would be the Arduino and the motor controller, and of course the business end of any buttons and switches. So the only heat generated would come from those components. If I use a 7805 then I may have a heat issue. I don't have the specs on that yet, so will have to wait to see what I need. But a small 12V fan is a possibility, but than I am getting into the larger boxes that I wanted to avoid.

J

I'd go with a switching regulator vs a 7805.
https://www.digikey.com/products/en/power-supplies-board-mount/dc-dc-converters/922?k=oki+murata&k=&pkeyword=oki+murata&pv1525=62&FV=ffe0039a&mnonly=0&newproducts=0&ColumnSort=0&page=1&stock=1&quantity=0&ptm=0&fid=0&pageSize=25
Or similar from Pololu.com

CrossRoads:
I'd go with a switching regulator vs a 7805.
https://www.digikey.com/products/en/power-supplies-board-mount/dc-dc-converters/922?k=oki+murata&k=&pkeyword=oki+murata&pv1525=62&FV=ffe0039a&mnonly=0&newproducts=0&ColumnSort=0&page=1&stock=1&quantity=0&ptm=0&fid=0&pageSize=25
Or similar from Pololu.com

Ok, so some back of the envelope calculations, that switching regulator would give off about .008 BTU. That's not very much, so probably not hurt to have it inside a box, and especially if I open some breather holes.

ov10fac:
would give off about .008 BTU.

Jeez. I'm 65 so you must be 165. I had a book with BTUs about 45 years ago. Watts are so much easier. :slight_smile:

...R