StickDuino - A USB Stick sized clone

StickDuinos are now available. The StickDuino is a Diecimila compatible clone shrunk down to the format of a USB key. People always ask "why not a USB stick", "why no cyrstal", "why so expensive"; here you go, it's small, plugs directly into a USB port, uses a crystal, and costs just under $20. Their product page has some additional details (including the schematic, board, and parts list). They're currently available fully assembled for just under $20USD, and there should be bare boards available soon.

hi spiffie. looks very nice, i like small footprint

can you tell just a little more about powering the stick

I assume connected to usb it take the voltage form the usb, but runnung standalone: is there autoswitching feature like the nano does?

and what about 3,3 and 5V, Is it available, when power is via VIN with 9V?

I just switched from the diecimila to nano for my panorama-robot, but the stickduino could be an alternative.

I assume connected to usb it take the voltage form the usb, but runnung standalone: is there autoswitching feature like the nano does?

Yes, the StickDuino includes a diode isolating the USB connector from any external 5V supply.

what about 3,3 and 5V, Is it available, when power is via VIN with 9V

The StickDuino can only be powered by the USB port or a regulated 3.3V or 5V external source. If you'd like to use a 9V supply, you should attach a regulator (the 7805/78L05 will work fine). 3.3V is generated by the FT232 (like the Nano and Diecimila) and is available when powered from any 5V source (including USB).

Hi Spiffed

Hope you can help.

I've just purchased two Stickduinos and I'm confused about how to supply external power. Do I need to move (unsolder) the small "jumper" near the USB connector? And, which pins would I use to supply say 5V from an external regulated power supply. I just want to be sure I don't blow it up!

Thanks in advance.

I bought one of these because it seems like a great board for developing AVR software: just plug it in, compile, and run. Something I could use in an airport without looking suspicious.

Unfortunately, it doesn't plug securely into the USB ports of my MacBook. That is, if I don't hold it in place, it falls out, and it doesn't make a steady connection. Any tips for securing it in place? Or are my USB ports just too loose?

I've just purchased two Stickduinos and I'm confused about how to supply external power.

You can supply regulated 5V power to any of the pin labeled '5V' (below the FTDI chip).

Do I need to move (unsolder) the small "jumper" near the USB connector?

The small "jumper" (0 ohm resistor) controls whether the ATmega is supplied from the 5V or the 3.3V rail.

Unfortunately, it doesn't plug securely into the USB ports of my MacBook. That is, if I don't hold it in place, it falls out, and it doesn't make a steady connection. Any tips for securing it in place?

I haven't noticed any issues with either the MacBook, iBook, or PowerBook here, but you can make a tighter fit by 'tinning' the USB pads with enough solder to form a nice bubble along them. I would suggest paste, but solid solder will work just fine too.

You can also try applying tape to the under-side of the board to increase it's thickness.

Thanks for the reply.

All works beautifully now. By the way, love the idea and the design!

I'll be ordering a couple more soon.

This is a cool little device :)

I wonder if anyone (besides me) has considered a socketed pdip version?

Perhaps with a jumper/switch for having it ser-jtag the code onto the chip?

Then it would be like a tiny little production device.

Slick idea of using the circuit board for USB connections but I'd really rather have a USB-A connector on this puppy. Reminds me of my Texas Instruments eZ430-2013 -- a nice product for the same price but the Atmel stick has 8x the flash, 16x the RAM, 512-bytes of EEPROM, A/D converters, a few more GPIO, etc, etc... but you get the picture.

Mellis confirmed what I was worried about -- a loose fit into a USB connector. I'd really rather have a "real" USB connector. Just my US$0.02.

"Mellis confirmed what I was worried about -- a loose fit into a USB connector."

But that is so easy to address (shim, solder blobs). Doesn't worry me a bit, nothing life threatening running on my equipment :) I use the same "use a bit of pcb shaped to size" technique for lots of applications.

Nice, will you build one with a through hole in it?

I'd really rather have a USB-A connector on this puppy

He does sell a product with the USB connector. Its called the iDuino: http://spiffie.org/kits/iduino/

Alas, it's not the type that will directly plug into your PC/laptop like the StickDuino. The iDuino needs a regular ol' USB-A/B cable.