Submarine control - Steering servo motors and Motor contollers

Hi to anyone that might be able to help!
I am a complete newby to electronics. my background is in mechanics so I need help. I have been told that the Arduino boards/gear can solve my problem with the help of the forum, i hope this is true!

I am building a one man submarine. It will be running a 12v system. The thrusters will be able to rotate for direction around a 180 degree range. There are two thrusters.
I have 180kg/cm servo motors to control the rotation of the truster motors (pictures attached)
The thrusters are 400w trolling motors.

What I want to be able to do is control the two servo motors individually off two small thumb joystick potentiometers as you had on your game controller Arduino board. I would want neutral to be horizontal on the thrusters, back on the joystick will be down on the thrusters, and forward would be up on the thrusters moving through 90 degrees each way.
Something like this? http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/252A103B60NA/252A103B60NA-ND/303390
On the Arduino Duo board?

I also want to be able to control the motors with a trigger mechanism. I would want to pull the trigger to move the thrusters forward and push the trigger away to go back (trigger will have a finger hole in it. This can be a normal potentiometer i orientate sideways and 3d print a trigger. Alternatively, I could use a 0-100% pot and then have a push button reverse which operates 100%. Obviously I will have less control like this but it would work and might be easier.

I have now spoken to and visited many shops and no one seems to be able to help me. I would be great if you could help me which what hardware to purchase and from where and then after that we could program this assuming it’s an Arduino board. I am happy if the motor controllers are a separate system (I assume this is easier/better). Any help or advise will be appreciated.

Mike

photo 1.jpg

photo 2.jpg

Hi to anyone that might be able to help!
I am a complete newby to electronics. my background is in mechanics so I need help. I have been told that the Arduino boards/gear can solve my problem with the help of the forum, i hope this is true!

I am building a one man submarine. It will be running a 12v system. The thrusters will be able to rotate for direction around a 180 degree range. There are two thrusters.
I have 180kg/cm servo motors to control the rotation of the truster motors (pictures attached)
The thrusters are 400w trolling motors.

What I want to be able to do is control the two servo motors individually off two small thumb joystick potentiometers as you had on your game controller Arduino board. I would want neutral to be horizontal on the thrusters, back on the joystick will be down on the thrusters, and forward would be up on the thrusters moving through 90 degrees each way.
Something like this? http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/252A103B60NA/252A103B60NA-ND/303390
On the Arduino Duo board?

I also want to be able to control the motors with a trigger mechanism. I would want to pull the trigger to move the thrusters forward and push the trigger away to go back (trigger will have a finger hole in it. This can be a normal potentiometer i orientate sideways and 3d print a trigger. Alternatively, I could use a 0-100% pot and then have a push button reverse which operates 100%. Obviously I will have less control like this but it would work and might be easier.

I have now spoken to and visited many shops and no one seems to be able to help me. I would be great if you could help me which what hardware to purchase and from where and then after that we could program this assuming it’s an Arduino board. I am happy if the motor controllers are a separate system (I assume this is easier/better). Any help or advise will be appreciated.

Mike

photo 1.jpg

photo 2.jpg

I may have missed something, but I didn't see a description of what the photos are supposed to be.

What you want to do should be well within the capability of an Arduino.

However you haven't provided any details of the sort of servo or motor control system you plan to use. Post links to their datasheets.

If the servo takes the usual R/C type control input that will make things very easy.

If you have a h-bridge speed controller that can take 5v PWM output from the Arduino that, also, will make things very easy.

...R

I think we'd all like to see a more precise description of those "servo" motors you have pictured, but those motors appear to have a standard radio control servo interface. Since you want to control their position with a potentiometer what you need to do is take a look at the Knob tutorial.

From my experience with trolling motors they have a non-intuitive wiring/configuration -- they don't have a simple two-wire supply like a typical brushless motor would (mine had a third, smaller gauge, green wire and I never did figure out how to reverse it). You really want to post pictures of the innards of the trolling motors you're using before you get a bad answer from someone who is unfamiliar with the oddities of those types of motors.

Hi, sorry, but it is not good to double post your questions.

Tom..... :)

Hi, sorry but its not good to double post.

Tom... :)

Is this to actually carry a real person underwater? If so, I'd suggest you should also have some redundancy built in.

Cross-posts merged

DO NOT CROSS-POST - IT WASTES TIME AND PISSES PEOPLE OFF.

Robin2:
I may have missed something, but I didn’t see a description of what the photos are supposed to be.

What you want to do should be well within the capability of an Arduino.

However you haven’t provided any details of the sort of servo or motor control system you plan to use. Post links to their datasheets.

If the servo takes the usual R/C type control input that will make things very easy.

If you have a h-bridge speed controller that can take 5v PWM output from the Arduino that, also, will make things very easy.

…R

Thanks for your response.
I believe it takes the R/C input, but that is only because of the 3 prong plub pictured. the only info I have is below;

Voltage: 12Vdc ~ 24Vdc
Maximum current: 6.8A
No-load current: <500mA
Max torque: 320kg.cm(24v) ; 160kg.cm(12v)
No-load speed: 46 rev / min 12V ; 92rev / min @ 24V
Rotation angle: 180 ° (can be customized)
The input signal pulse width: 0.5 ~2.5ms
Dead time: 4us
Weight: 530g
Gear Material: Steel
Dimensions: 95.5mm X 60.5mm X 102.6mm
Application: medium and largerobots, mechanical arm, and otherhigh-power high-torque control areas.

I should state, that i dont know what I need or what I am doing, but I can learn fast and follow instructions and want to learn. so please use laymans terms with me!
basically all i want to do is control the avove servo through its motion by a small thumb joystick.

Mike

Chagrin:
I think we’d all like to see a more precise description of those “servo” motors you have pictured, but those motors appear to have a standard radio control servo interface. Since you want to control their position with a potentiometer what you need to do is take a look at the Knob tutorial.

From my experience with trolling motors they have a non-intuitive wiring/configuration – they don’t have a simple two-wire supply like a typical brushless motor would (mine had a third, smaller gauge, green wire and I never did figure out how to reverse it). You really want to post pictures of the innards of the trolling motors you’re using before you get a bad answer from someone who is unfamiliar with the oddities of those types of motors.

Hi, Thanks for the response.

I can see the knob page and it looks pretty self explainatory. I just need to know which board to purchase to accept two small joystick POT’s and operate two motors independently? also, what joystick pots do I need ie. what range, output or any other specs i should use?

Trolling motor - I have attached a picture of the motor controller that comes with the 400w trolling motor. and the wiring. (to see the internals I have to pull it out of the new thruster casing and open it up, as I cannot remember the internal configuration) but its big RED and WHITE and the two smaller wires. one might be used for reverse?

what do you think I need to control this? do I need to pull apart the internals to show?

Mike

image (1).jpeg

Photos look nice but they are not actually much use here. You need to post links to the datasheets for the devices you are thinking of using.

An Arduino Uno should probably do what you want and it is the best beginners board. It has 6 analog inputs to take inputs from potentiometers. A single joystick probably has two potentiometers.

...R

Robin2: Photos look nice but they are not actually much use here. You need to post links to the datasheets for the devices you are thinking of using.

An Arduino Uno should probably do what you want and it is the best beginners board. It has 6 analog inputs to take inputs from potentiometers. A single joystick probably has two potentiometers.

...R

thanks. I posted all the tech data I have for the servo motor. in the above post. The trolling motor doesnt have any data - as it is just a trolling motor and sold as such. its 400w. that is all it says. Most importantly from this forum i see is the control of the servo motors which seems to be able to do from the UNO and two joy stick POT's and some coding. So I know I need the UNO. what Joystick POT should i use (single axis is fine obviously) and where is the best place to get them?

Most R/C hobby servos only have about 170° of travel (depends on the make/model). However a sail winch, used on R/C model sailboats, can allow 360° (sometimes more) of rotation and is controlled in the same manner as a standard hobby servo.

That large servo sounds like it takes standard signals, you just need to use the Servo library to control it. Route your high current separately from the Arduino wiring, share the grounds at the servo itself.

NewbyMike: what Joystick POT should i use (single axis is fine obviously) and where is the best place to get them?

Stating mostly from opinion, but I think you'd be better off with an arcade-type joystick that uses microswitches instead of trying to find a joystick based on potentiometers. The primary reason being that arcade joysticks are ready to take quite a bit of abuse and the secondary reason in that it would be a more comfortable interface. You can program the arduino so that when you push the joystick in any direction it will slowly start increasing speed in that direction and then when released (self-centering joystick) it will hold that speed for you until you start pushing the joystick in the opposite direction to slow down, reverse, or turn. Basically it would allow you to keep motion without tying up your hands.

Example joysticks: https://www.sparkfun.com/products/9136?gclid=CM_6wI3QoMECFadj7AodVCwACQ http://www.adafruit.com/products/480?gclid=CM_H9qnQoMECFQQT7AodY34A3w

Regarding potentiometer-based joysticks, I've personally only seen very small ones (like you posted) or very expensive ones ($50 - $150). If you want to try building a joystick from scratch then you would want to use "wirewound" potentiometers in the 10K range. Wirewound pots are generally sealed and a bit more durable.

Chagrin:

NewbyMike: what Joystick POT should i use (single axis is fine obviously) and where is the best place to get them?

Stating mostly from opinion, but I think you'd be better off with an arcade-type joystick that uses microswitches instead of trying to find a joystick based on potentiometers. The primary reason being that arcade joysticks are ready to take quite a bit of abuse and the secondary reason in that it would be a more comfortable interface. You can program the arduino so that when you push the joystick in any direction it will slowly start increasing speed in that direction and then when released (self-centering joystick) it will hold that speed for you until you start pushing the joystick in the opposite direction to slow down, reverse, or turn. Basically it would allow you to keep motion without tying up your hands.

Example joysticks: https://www.sparkfun.com/products/9136?gclid=CM_6wI3QoMECFadj7AodVCwACQ http://www.adafruit.com/products/480?gclid=CM_H9qnQoMECFQQT7AodY34A3w

Regarding potentiometer-based joysticks, I've personally only seen very small ones (like you posted) or very expensive ones ($50 - $150). If you want to try building a joystick from scratch then you would want to use "wirewound" potentiometers in the 10K range. Wirewound pots are generally sealed and a bit more durable.

Thanks, But what i want to do for the forward movement is use very small degrees of change in power, there are times when i wont want full power, or i will want only a small amount for a long time. I was thinking about using a POT and making it a trigger mechanism, as stated in my first post. this is only for the motor controller which will be wired seperately from the servo motors.

What joystivk do I use for servo motos control. I need two single axis like on the game controller Arduino do. Where can I get these?

MarkT: That large servo sounds like it takes standard signals, you just need to use the Servo library to control it. Route your high current separately from the Arduino wiring, share the grounds at the servo itself.

Thanks. WHat single axis pot do i use and where can i get them? I want one similar/the same as the one on the hand controller that Arduino do. :) I think that is my last question/ propblem before I have wired it up and ready to program. I assume the programming will be in the servo help page!?

Mike

I assume you already have an arduino, multimeter, breadboard, jumpers, power supplies, etc. to support your project. That being said, I suggest you get a couple of the below servos and modify for continuous rotation (very easy), and the below joysticks, and start experimenting to verify your joystick control concept. I doubt anyone in the forum has built what you plan, so reading DIY ROV sites will probably provide info that you need.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/3-X-New-Handle-Joystick-3D-for-Sony-Playstation2-PS2-PS-2-10V-/230803703512?hash=item35bcf906d8

https://www.google.com/search?as_q=rov+build&as_epq=&as_oq=&as_eq=&as_nlo=&as_nhi=&lr=&cr=&as_qdr=all&as_sitesearch=&as_occt=any&safe=images&tbs=&as_filetype=&as_rights=&gws_rd=ssl

zoomkat: get a couple of the below servos and modify for continuous rotation

Pretty sure an ROV submarine is going to need position feedback on the servos...

tylernt:

zoomkat: get a couple of the below servos and modify for continuous rotation

Pretty sure an ROV submarine is going to need position feedback on the servos...

Not if they are to simulate the trolling motor control setup. Joystick control of regular servos for position control is fairly simple and strait forward, just don't modify the servos..