suggestions for easy (round hole) panel mount access to arduino USB port

My NANO based project is going into a permanent enclosure, and though I've now passed several milestones of time without a code change, I'd be naive to think I'll never need one. So I'm exploring ways to extend the USB port to the outside world. There are a lot of "panel" mount extenders out there, but most of the ones that are easy to mount (which to me means a round hole that can simply be drilled) get very pricey. Two things I'm considering, but other suggestions are welcome. The first is a really nice waterproof (IP67 spec) with a cover, on ali express

These can come with short (0.2M) cables which I could make fit, and as these specialty connectors go, the price of $6.50 (USD) is not crazy. But its still seems like overkill, and similar panel mount USB mini connectors that are ROUND only get more pricey.

Another option that is really interesting are these USB-mini to 3.5MM jacks...

These are extremely cheap, I guess because a lot of cameras and MP3 players have used a similar scheme. Though they are not quite as easy to mount, it seems that a tight fitting round hole with a little silicon rubber on the inside ought to do it. Anyone see any down-side, beyond my probably having to scratch build a cable for the PC?

Any other easy panel mount extenders I'm missing?

That 3.5mm socket is for a microphone. It won't carry USB signals. The Gopro detects what is plugged in and changes the function of that port.

You could make your own cable to do this if you had a 3.5mm plug and socket with 4 conductors. Like a phone's headphone plug which has 1 extra for the microphone. Look for "TRRS" (Tip, Ring, Ring, Sleeve). If you are reasonably careful, you can wire your own USB cables.

I find TRRS to be difficult to get. Normal stereo TRS plugs are a thousand times more common.

I think the $6.50 is going to be your best option.

MorganS:
That 3.5mm socket is for a microphone. It won't carry USB signals. The Gopro detects what is plugged in and changes the function of that port.

You could make your own cable to do this if you had a 3.5mm plug and socket with 4 conductors. Like a phone's headphone plug which has 1 extra for the microphone. Look for "TRRS" (Tip, Ring, Ring, Sleeve). If you are reasonably careful, you can wire your own USB cables.

I find TRRS to be difficult to get. Normal stereo TRS plugs are a thousand times more common.

I think the $6.50 is going to be your best option.

I had found this diagram on a Texas Instruments forum. Though its for the original larger 4 wire USB. But from this I assumed there would be no actual electronics inside such an adapter. I realize the other end (the TRRS plug) could be a problem if I needed to supply one with each distributed device, but its just the opposite! I only need to make one computer cable, and can cannibalize an old earphone/microphone combo to make it. But for the arduino devices, which will be locked into enclosures, these 88¢ adapters are tempting. That is, unless you're suggesting there is some hidden electronics in these adapters which could interfere with USB usage? Otherwise, the only downside I see is that if I sent new code to an end user for them to upload a newer version of my code. But that could be an advantage if I didn't particularly want and end user to know there was a "tempting" usb port to play with.

I wonder if a Nano would fit in one of these:


Then you could use an RJ11 plug to access the internal USB jack [by, of course, wiring the internal connections to a USB plug that would plug into the Nano's jack].

Or, one of these on a junction box:

Well those really aren't a bad idea, but in this case the enclosure is already picked out, and its a bit larger because it sports a control panel with an LCD display, 4 key key-pad, several LEDs and a few control switches. The idea of bringing out the USB was a bit of an after-thought (read: poor planning), when i realized that if this project becomes a successful product for people to use, its just a matter of time before some custom feature or coding improvement comes about, and it sure would be nice to be able to make the "upgrade" without taking the whole thing apart. Live and learn I guess.

This is what I have been doing.

https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=445951.msg3140658#msg3140658

Three.jpg

larryd:
This is what I have been doing.

https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=445951.msg3140658#msg3140658

Three.jpg

Its nice, but if I were able to easily add rectangular holes, I’d be able to use these too.

Time to invest in a nibbler and files.

Time to invest in a nibbler

Or a hole punch
Example hole punch

Or get access to a laser-cutter. Or get a panel made from a DXF file, probably not too expensive
these days if you are prepared to wait for postage from China?

PeterPan321:
Its nice, but if I were able to easily add rectangular holes, I'd be able to use these too.

Well I actually mis-spoke. I actually do already have an X/Y moving table vise on a drill press set up with milling machine bits. I know HOW to make rectangular holes, but my post was about looking for a ROUND solution, so I could do this easily and neatly on several enclosures.

Normally I have a PC board cut with no copper (mechanical only), and let the board house cut all my holes (round, square, rectangular, whatever). This time it was an afterthought, so I'll likely go with one of the products I linked, unless someone knows of a better round USB connector that doesn't cost a fortune.

PeterPan321:

That is designed for audio, not high speed data, so I would be surprised if it would work.
Tom... :slight_smile: