Sugru silicon stuff (self-setting rubber for DIY)

Has anyone hands on experience with Sugru? Positive or negative, there are only a few threads mentioning this material and it looks quite useful.

Link - http://sugru.com/ -

I assume it's silicone rubber. I have used something similar (EasyMold). The stuff makes [u]great[/u] tool handles.

Some things I know...

• If it will be in contact with food (after curing, of course) make certain it is "food grade".

• Be weary of the cure time. It can be difficult to get it in the right shape within one minute. After about half the cure time it will get significantly rigid. A little planning goes a long way.

• This... http://sugru.com/us/guides/how-to-repair-your-dishwasher ...is very difficult to get right. It naturally tends to pull away from other materials. It is not glue or even glue-like. Make certain what it is supposed to "stick" to is very clean.

• It conducts heat fairly well (makes a good sealer for temperature sensors).

• Make certain it is well mixed.

• Make certain it is stable over about double the cure time (don't move it around).

• While curing, it will sag because of gravity.

• If you buy in "bulk", do not accidentally contaminate one with the other or you will end up with a hockey puck.

This is a bit creepy: "This brightly coloured [u]smelly[/u] silicone blob..." None of the silicone rubber I've worked with is "smelly".

I think I paid about $20 per ounce the last time I bought some (came in two equally sized containers).

thanks, useful info.

apparently you can fake it with corn starch and caulk

http://www.instructables.com/id/How-To-Make-Your-Own-Sugru-Substitute/

if that's anything like the name brand recipe, it explains the smell

robtillaart: Has anyone hands on experience with Sugru? Positive or negative, there are only a few threads mentioning this material and it looks quite useful.

Link - http://sugru.com/ -

My grandkids love the stuff. It comes in many colors and sticks to most anything, except your hands.

have used something similar (EasyMold).

As far as I can tell, sugru is subtly different than prior silicone molding compounds, particularly in that it's designed to stick to things rather than pull away cleanly. I haven't actually used it myself.

Gotta love this bit...

We bought a small mixer and working with one of our engineer friends to design a packaging machine, we built it for £5,000 and it ran on an arduino.

Hi,

I used Sugru quite a few things and it's good at joining things together. I found it expensive though.

I also use this two part epoxy putty which is great to work with:

http://www.milliput.com/home.htm

Best thing since sliced bread. I have fixed a broken handle on a casserole/pot. The handle broke of, I made a new one of two packets SUGRO and stuck it on the brackets. Has worked fine for four months (and I lift the pot with 2-3 litres boiling water in it). Also the cutlery/silverware-basket in the dishwasher the plastic netting in the bottom broke. I did some patching with Sugro. Still there after 5 months of daily dishwasher operation - and holding the cutlery.

This is a pretty impressive video, demonstrating the "stickiness" capabilities pretty well: http://blog.makezine.com/2012/12/19/sugru-and-lego/ (It IS an advertisement. YMMV.)