Supply or Antenna problem

Hi,

I have four soil moisture sensors. We have 1 Nrf24l01 and Nrf24l01 Adapter. One of them is Arduino Nano.
I am combining the + and-of 4 sensors with nrf24l01 and feeding it from the Arduino’s 5V output. There is a receiver circuit without sensors. I supply the Arduino with an external 9 V battery. But when the battery drops to 7 V, it can’t get the data I sent. I already feed the receiver circuit from the computer. removed the battery from the transmitter circuit and fed it from the computer. But he doesn’t get the data again. However, I can hold the antennas to a certain position and get it correctly. I didn’t understand if the problem was with the antennas or Arduino’s feed.
Each of the sensors is 5.5 mA. Nrf24l01+pa+lna max current 115 mA. I need to put in another feed instead of 9V or am I supposed to change antennas? Thank you in advance for your help.

If you mean one of the PP3 style 9v batteries then they are unsuitable for powering an Arduino - they are not designed to produce high currents. Try a pack of 6 x AA alkaline cells.

If you are drawing power for the nRF24 from the 3.3v pin of the nano it probably cannot supply enough current. If that seems to be the problem try powering the nRF24 from a pair of AA alkaline cells (3v) with the battery GND connected to the Arduino GND.

If none of that helps please post a diagram showing how you have everything connected.

...R Simple nRF24L01+ Tutorial

Thank you very much for your reply.

I feed the Arduino with 9V 6F22 Zinc-Carbon batteries. I use the Nrf24l01 + with the adapter. The adapter works with 5 V and reduces to 3.3 V for operation of Nrf24l01. I connect the adapter and the sensors and feed it from the Arduino's 5V output. And the antenna could be a problem? Or is there only a problem with my feeding? Not: I try to make a drawing with fritzing at a convenient time.

ArduinoPlus: Thank you very much for your reply.

I feed the Arduino with 9V 6F22 Zinc-Carbon batteries. I use the Nrf24l01 + with the adapter. The adapter works with 5 V and reduces to 3.3 V for operation of Nrf24l01. I connect the adapter and the sensors and feed it from the Arduino's 5V output. And the antenna could be a problem? Or is there only a problem with my feeding? Not: I try to make a drawing with fritzing at a convenient time.

Still the same old PP3 smoke alarm battery.

Paul

Paul_KD7HB: Still the same old PP3 smoke alarm battery.

Paul

Can 2S Li-po batteries be used instead of 6 AA batteries?

Yes, but LiPo batteries are not recommended. They require a low voltage cutoff circuit, or they will be destroyed by over-discharge.

ArduinoPlus: Not: I try to make a drawing with fritzing at a convenient time.

Please don't use Fritzing.

Just make a simple pencil drawing and post a photo of the drawing. See this Simple Image Guide

...R

ArduinoPlus: My drawing is very bad, but the connection patterns are understandable.

Your image is not visible. See the guidelines in the link I gave you.

...R

Disconnect the 9 volt battery. Your Arduino is powered by the 5 volt pin you have connected to the 5 volt source.

Paul

I feed the receiver side from the computer. But I have to feed the transmitter externally. I don’t have the alternative to the battery as a source because it needs to be portable. I’m going to try 6 AA batteries. Do you think the power of the 5 V pin is enough for the sensor and rf module that I connect?

ArduinoPlus: I feed the receiver side from the computer. But I have to feed the transmitter externally.

You should not be trying to do that through the nano.

If the nano is powered from the PC and the external power is only for the nRF24 then get rid of the power adapter and just power it from a pair of AA alkaline cells (3v) with the battery GND connected to the Arduino GND. That way you avoid all the energy losses that occur when stepping down the 9v to 3.3v

...R

Actually, I'm talking about the whole circuit I meant by the transmitter. My mistake. I was wrong. A brief summary of the elements in my directv receiver and transmitter circuits:

Transmitter circuit :

Nrf24l01+, Yl-105 Adapter, four sensor(5.5 mA), Arduino nano, 9V battery

Receive circuit: Nrf24l01+,YL-105 Adapter, Arduino Nano, Feeding from computer.

The connection forms are the same as the one I draw above. The only difference is that there are no sensors on the receiver side. Is the use of Yl-105 in the receiver circuit bad for communication?

ArduinoPlus: The connection forms are the same as the one I draw above. The only difference is that there are no sensors on the receiver side. Is the use of Yl-105 in the receiver circuit bad for communication?

Wireless problems can be very difficult to debug.

For testing it would be a good idea to power the nRF24s either {A} using the YL-105 fed from a separate 5v power source or {B} without the YL-105 and powered by a pair of AA alkaline cells (3v). In both cases the nRf24 GND needs to be connected to the Arduino GND.

It would also be wise to power both nRF24s the same way - at least until you have successful communication.

Get rid of the small 9v battery for ALL tests.

...R

I understand what you mean.Thank you very much for your suggestions. So how do I find a 5v resource I want to ask? I know there are no 5 V batteries.

ArduinoPlus: So how do I find a 5v resource I want to ask?

Why do you need a 5v source - I suggested a pair of AA alkaline cells for the nRF24.

If you need 5v for testing then use a wall-wart.

...R

After feeding Nrf24l01, I have to feed the Arduino from the Vin and Gnd pins. Transmitter circuit will be portable. I can't get power from the socket. I can feed the Arduino from Vin and Gnd pins between 7-12V. That's what the Arduino says about NANO. I want to use nRF24L01 with its adapter. So I wonder how I feed him 5V. In summary I have to feed both Arduino and Nrf24l01.

Try using 3 x AA alkaline cells (4.5v) connected to the Arduino 5v pin. That works for me. Alternatively 4 x AA NiMh cells will give 4.8v.

...R