Switch sequencing - !WARNING! PWOT \ SPOILERS

Hi there my first post, and I don't write many, so please forgive me.
I live in the UK, in the depths of cullompton where technology is still making its way into fibre.

I like simple projexts. This looks fun.

This stupid video got me interested in the little trick and we all like tricks.

If your those who like to "not know how the magic works" just watch the tube and leaf.

Other wise, if your intrigued as me then I am sure this is a simple sequencer, but how do I make one please?

Opps, did I say what it was, awwww.

I understand the concept that he is switching the bulbs on from left to right to create the sequence, but I'm missing the parts on

10 read switch state (http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=107196.0)
20 learn sequence (switch on corresponding switch in order of bulbs from left to right)
30 delay
40 play back sequence to said switch until inactive for 10 seconds
50 reset switch sequence
60 goto 10

Please help, I work at a pub and this will make a few people go , I hate you...... :slight_smile:
Sorry I am a little tired.
EOL

It's a cute trick and should be easy enough to do. Try taking a stab at it. Basically a state machine should do it for you: Gammon Forum : Electronics : Microprocessors : State machines

Start off by making a state diagram as described on the above page.

This is the same comment I made on the video.

I know how it works. There are two key aspects to make this work.
One, the magnets in the switch caps have different strengths.
Two, there are multiple contact points in each of the bulbs specific to that bulb.

Red: 1 contact + ground.
Blue: 2 contact points (both must be on for the bulb to be on) + ground
Yellow: 2 contact points (arranged differently from blue) + ground
Green: 3 contact points (all must be on for the bulb to be on) + ground

The switches control the specific contact points in the bulbs, so no matter which socket the bulb is in, the switch will turn it on.
I had a PS2 controller that could do the same thing, here is the link.

https://www.google.com/search?q=ps2+movable+buttons&espv=2&biw=1536&bih=777&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=yXCGVIW3PIi8yQTNiYDYDQ&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAg#tbm=isch&q=ps2+controller+with+changeable+button+layout&spell=1&facrc=&imgdii=&imgrc=AZjuCwD3GC_2SM%253A%3Bbh9apStx7XbzvM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fimages.geeksimages.com%252Fimageshare%252F7%252F300x300%252F74160-unit.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.reddit.com%252Fr%252F3DS%252Fcomments%252F24gv58%252Fnintendo_files_patent_for_portable_device_with%252F%3B300%3B300

And another

Added: Being that the bulbs seem to screw in, it could also be a binary pattern out of the threading, but again different pattern = different bulb to be lit.

HazardsMind:
This is the same comment I made on the video.

I know how it works. There are two key aspects to make this work.
One, the magnets in the switch caps have different strengths.
Two, there are multiple contact points in each of the bulbs specific to that bulb.

Red: 1 contact + ground.
Blue: 2 contact points (both must be on for the bulb to be on) + ground
Yellow: 2 contact points (arranged differently from blue) + ground
Green: 3 contact points (all must be on for the bulb to be on) + ground

I don't think that's how this one works. I believe that on startup, the first four switches that are used will decide which switches connect to which socket.

Also it goes into this instruction mode if no switches have been activated for say, 5 seconds.

So you can switch the bulbs around, switch the colours of the switch covers around. And once you've finished your faffing the board will now be in "learn" mode. So you then just click the switches in the new order.

Each time the change is made, he operates the switches in order of the lamps. Note the lamps are always lit in the same position sequence after each change. This programs the sequence. Then the random switches operate the lamps, a time between puts it back in learn mode.

Weedpharma

HazardsMind:
One, the magnets in the switch caps have different strengths.

The video showed him doing it without the caps at all.

Another guy had a video demonstrating the same idea with LEDs, which rules out multiple pins under the globes.

Besides, I don't see how having special globes helps detect when he moves the switch caps around.

Assuming it uses the "learning" technique, a smart onlooker could defeat it by demanding that a certain globe be turned on first. But his assistant said practically nothing.

He says in the video "it doesn't matter what order we turn the switches on" which is a bit of misdirection, because by the time he demonstrates that, it has learned the sequence, and he can flip the switches in any order.

One of the videos showed a really complex looking board. I'm sure this could be done with a Uno, or a breadboard Atmega328 or similar. The logic is straightforward. The hard part in his case would be getting those big globes to light, but four MOSFETs or relays should do the job admirably.