Switch that goes from off-on-off?

hey peeps im looking for a Switch that goes from off-on-off?, without a need of a pcb? like in the pic below, i need for a project but no idea if there is such a thing?

Karma for first time graphic posting.

What's the application?

Do you really need a push button with 3 levels? And latching or not? Because the only 3-level push buttons I know are in camera's. And I know of no latching multi-level buttons.

ok the application will be attached to a motor i when i push the button one full pull "or "push" it would "blip" the motor, or is there a way to do this with an arduino uno?

if so i would need the uno to be powered by a 11.1v lipo, and read the power for a lower voltage warning, and then transfer the voltage to the motor for a "blip"?

edit: the smaller the arduino the better as i need to save space? maybe a arduino beetle?

Please explain "push the button one full pull" and "blip the motor"...

I have seen 2-pole 3-throw slide switches (DPTT or 2P3T) that
are ON-ON-ON but to different circuits. Maybe you can use
one of those.
Herb

it needs to be a push type. for example: i know there is not a power source yet just a picture to try and help explain whats going on

You just want the motor to be powered for s short time when the trigger is pulled?

Do note:

  • You can't guarantee the "one turn" part
  • you can't guarantee someone will not hold the trigger in the ON part

The application sounds like an Arduino (even a Digispark) can do together with a transistor (heavily depends on the motor but that applies also on the switch). Or perfect for an oldschool 555 in one-shot mode.

And of course, you would almost forget it, you could also make that one shot in hardware (the non-electronic type).

But if you are already building hardware and don't care about the two notes, you can also make the trigger slide along a push button (OFF - (ON)) like a simple microswitch and have a "hump" on that slider that only pushes the switch halfway.

Center-off or "on-off-on" toggle switches are super-common ([u]example[/u]).

Sounds like you need a normal push-switch and a pulse generator, not a custom switch

Your diagram indicates this is a sort of Nerf gun or similar.

Always repeating this, the "XY Problem":

Detail exactly what it is you want to do, explain that you have already built the gun, give us the Web reference for the motor you used and show us the detailed photos of your assembly.

Then and only then we can advise you on what parts you need. :astonished:

With an Arduino you can just have it run the motor for some time the moment the button gets pressed, not doing anything else until the button gets released again.

If you must guarantee a single turn always continuing in the same direction you have to look for a stepper motor. If it's got to turn back after that turn, servo.

wvmarle:
If you must guarantee a single turn always continuing in the same direction you have to look for a stepper motor.

Or, if the motor turns slowly enough that it will reliably stop in the same position every time, and you can fit a 'home' switch of some sort (optical/hall/limit), the Arduino could start the motor and run it 'til it hits the switch again.

dougp:
Or, if the motor turns slowly enough that it will reliably stop in the same position every time, and you can fit a 'home' switch of some sort (optical/hall/limit), the Arduino could start the motor and run it 'til it hits the switch again.

Gear motor.

dougp:
Or, if the motor turns slowly enough that it will reliably stop in the same position every time, and you can fit a 'home' switch of some sort (optical/hall/limit), the Arduino could start the motor and run it 'til it hits the switch again.

True. May be a cheaper option as well. An encoder could be of help here as well, in conjunction with the home switch.

Unfortunately OP forgot to indicate how fast this movement has to be, or how accurate, or how much torque and inertia are involved, or whether there are space restrictions, etc.

wvmarle:
Unfortunately OP forgot to indicate how fast this movement has to be, or how accurate, or how much torque and inertia are involved, or whether there are space restrictions, etc.

As I pointed out in #10. :roll_eyes:

Just a comment.
I have been looking for something similar. It is a small rotary switch, but is indexed using a push button.
I know they exist, as I worked on a gizmo a while back, that had one.

Fof