Switching 24v with a SSR

I've bought a component that runs on 24v.

I thought it would be easy to lay my hands on a wall wart that would output 24v which I could switch with a SSR but actually it's proving difficult. Yes transformers do seem to be available but they're big and bulky (think laptop style).

Would it be an idea to repurchase my component in a more common and readily available voltage, for example 12v? Or is there a third option I'm overlooking?

thanks! :-)

Without knowing what your “component” is, (wait maybe I don’t want to see “your component”?!) it is difficult to say.

Are these too big and bulky?
http://www.ledsupply.com/power-supplies/desktop-power-supply-24vdc-2.5amp?gclid=CLXA6rXAxLwCFQtgMgoduHcAPA
http://www.ebay.com/itm/NEW-24V-DC-2-7A-Switching-Power-Supply-Adapter-Input-100-240VAC-24-VDC-2-7A-/121207165406

You could look at building your own:

https://www.futurlec.com/Linear/7824Tpr.shtml

although I wouldn’t do that unless you are very comfortable with the idea.

You need to switch 24V AC ! ?? A SSR use 24V to det a LED working ? This is sure a very special case. I guess misunderstood..

Um what component are you using and what is its current draw? The amount of current it needs will greatly affect the size. Also is it AC or DC???

[quote author=Drew Davis link=topic=217012.msg1586713#msg1586713 date=1392141166] Um what component are you using and what is its current draw? The amount of current it needs will greatly affect the size. Also is it AC or DC??? [/quote]

The component is this, a 24v DC rotating light. Its current draw is 400mA.

I have found some smaller wall warts so I guess I'll just grab one of those.

thanks all

Thanks for the specs. Here is what I would get...

http://www.ebay.com/itm/US-DC-24V-500mA-1A-Switching-Power-Supply-adapter-100-240-AC-/350681440782?pt=US_Surveillance_Cables_Adapters_Connectors&hash=item51a63e220e

or

http://www.amazon.com/Switching-adapter-100-240-AbleGrid-Trademarked/dp/B00D1SRAMY/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&qid=1392151317&sr=8-6&keywords=24v+500ma+power+supply

hmm. I’m looking to switch this device with a solid state relay because I am very keen on the ability to just drive the entire thing from an Arduino pin. But I’ve come up against a weird (to me) thing: the vast, vast majority of SSRs I can see to buy don’t seem able to switch AC voltages lower than 24v? Why might that be? THANKS

$_12.JPG

.. it will do ! (if 'this device' is a AC to DC adapter) the SSR can NOT switch DC current

The 25A type is cheapest

For 400mA, why not just use a simple MOSFET? Anything sold as a "DC SSR" is going to be a high power MOSFET anyway, like these from Crydom.

http://www.crydom.com/en/Products/Catalog/AdvancedWebPage.aspx?CategoryText1=Panel%20Mount&CategoryText2=DC%20Output%20SSR&CategoryText3=1-DC%20Series%20MOSFET%20output%20-%20Ratings%20from%207A%20to%20100A%20and%20100%20to%20500%20VDC&SBCatPage=

Solid state relays use a triac to allow it to switch AC in both directions.

A mosfet would be more appropriate to switch 24v dc.

[quote author=many lads] A mosfet [/quote]

Thanks. Would this one cut the mustard?

That one will do. .. I would choose one in a TO220 format for easier printlayout e.g. like this one http://www.onsemi.com/pub_link/Collateral/NTP60N06L-D.PDF

A solid-state relay could be used to switch the AC for the 24V supply.

[quote author=Runaway Pancake link=topic=217012.msg1592384#msg1592384 date=1392467077] A solid-state relay could be used to switch the AC for the 24V supply. [/quote]

ah but it's DC... thanks though

Dane: [quote author=Runaway Pancake link=topic=217012.msg1592384#msg1592384 date=1392467077] A solid-state relay could be used to switch the AC for the 24V supply.

ah but it's DC... thanks though [/quote] He means to switch the AC side of a AC to DC converter.

[quote author=James C4S link=topic=217012.msg1592592#msg1592592 date=1392475076] switch the AC side of a AC to DC converter. [/quote] oops, sorry, my bad. Yes, I guess I could do that but it's a bit sort of messy to my mind in terms of "getting in between" the wall plug and the power supply.

So I'm back at mosfets.

What is the advantage of NTP60N06L over FDP7030BL? THe latter is quite a bit cheaper and SEEMS to be suitable.

THANKS og takk!

Dane: What is the advantage of NTP60N06L over FDP7030BL? THe latter is quite a bit cheaper and SEEMS to be suitable.

Either is suitable for your application. Looks like the more expensive one is rated for 60V operation while the cheaper is rated for 30V.

[quote author=James C4S link=topic=217012.msg1593006#msg1593006 date=1392494178]

Dane: What is the advantage of NTP60N06L over FDP7030BL? THe latter is quite a bit cheaper and SEEMS to be suitable.

Either is suitable for your application. Looks like the more expensive one is rated for 60V operation while the cheaper is rated for 30V.[/quote]

Thank you. I thought that was the only difference but it is so reassuring to have it confirmed.