The beginners dilemma

Just like this:-

flow chart.jpg

yes, exactly And both methods do work (short time) :-)

Grumpy_Mike:
Just like this:-

I am going to print a modified copy of this and hang it in my garage, with arrows pointing down to the requisite items on a shelf.

SirNickity:

Grumpy_Mike: Just like this:-

I am going to print a modified copy of this and hang it in my garage, with arrows pointing down to the requisite items on a shelf.

]:) And what if someone switches the items ]:D

WD40 is not oil. Too many people treat it like it is.

Correct. And the "WD40 company" thrives by that, as you will need to reapply it over and over again, until something is dissolved too much, and fails forever.

Hi, now if it wasn't for the nuclear industry we might not have WD40.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WD-40

Tom....... :)

WD40 RP-7 one of many CRC products

polymorph: WD40 is not oil. Too many people treat it like it is.

That's not what the Wikipedia link says.

"WD-40 is primarily composed of various hydrocarbons." "The long-term active ingredient is a non-volatile, viscous oil which remains on the surface, providing lubrication and protection from moisture."

They state the MSDS sheet says "<25% petroleum base oil, presumably a mineral oil or light lubricating oil."

You have other information?

My experience has been that there is so little "long term" ingredients in it, that for 99.99% of the purposes, it might as well not be there.

Why go to Wikipedia to read what someone else says about the MSDS?

http://www.wd40company.com/files/pdf/msds-wd494716385.pdf

I've seen hinges destroyed with it, because it washed out the original grease and what it left was insufficient. I've seen rotating bearings destroyed for the same reason. I've seen potentiometers and switches ruined by it.

It has its uses. But in my experience, it sucks as a lubricant except only temporarily.

Hi, its great Water Dispersant/Displacer, hence WD.

I’ve been told by mechanics that they regard it as a dry lubricant, great to get something stuck moving again, but no long term advantages compared to good oil or grease and regular maintenance.

Tom… :slight_smile:

Jantje:

SirNickity:

Grumpy_Mike: Just like this:-

I am going to print a modified copy of this and hang it in my garage, with arrows pointing down to the requisite items on a shelf.

]:) And what if someone switches the items ]:D

That reminds me of the old joke about the couple who didn't know the difference between putty and vaseline. All their windows fell out.

You mean:-

old joke about the newly wed couple who didn't know .......

Oh my god! What did they do with the putty?

I think that WD 40 is a manly scent that should be made into a cologne. Hoppe's #9 would be even better.

Heh.. I showed the engineering flowchart to my GF. Her reply: "WD40 isn't a lubricant, it's a solvent." I was so proud... :sweat_smile:

(Shortly followed by: "...what? I know stuff.")

Jantje: For instance why does my sliding door slide lots easier when I spray "the hard to reach nearly fully enclosed wheels" with WD40? :astonished:

Collected dirt/dust that the WD cleans out.

Also don't oil bicycle chains except to soak them overnight once a year if you haven't stretched it past usefulness by then. For everyday or weekly cleaning, run the chain through a kerosene soaked rag. Oil on a chain catches dirt and grit that wears the bearings. This from someone that did stretch chains and snap teeth off cogs from a year or less of constant wear.

Collected dirt/dust that the WD cleans out.

And that is, indeed, one of the things it is good for.

I had a car with a sticky seatbelt latch. OK when the weather was really dry, but bad when it was damp. Which was a lot of the time, 30 minutes south of Seattle, WA. Sniffing it told me it was some kind of cola spilled in it, probably multiple times.

So I hosed it out with 409 (water based cleaner/degreaser) on stream to wash it out, then WD40 to rinse out all the water. No oil added. Worked great.

GoForSmoke: Also don't oil bicycle chains except to soak them overnight once a year if you haven't stretched it past usefulness by then. For everyday or weekly cleaning, run the chain through a kerosene soaked rag. Oil on a chain catches dirt and grit that wears the bearings. This from someone that did stretch chains and snap teeth off cogs from a year or less of constant wear.

I've been using this stuff on my road bike and am pretty happy with it: http://www.finishlineusa.com/products/chain-lubricants/dry-lube

A couple times a year, I'll take the chain off, give it a thorough de-greasing and cleaning and and also clean what I can off the sprockets by working a rag between them. Just finished a fairly complete tear-down plus replaced the tires so it looks almost factory-new ATM :D

First port of call, Wikipedia. Second Snopes http://www.snopes.com/inboxer/household/wd-40.asp :D

When I worked in a gun shoppe, we used to get guys that went shooting “once in a blue moon”, they’d come in with their pride and joy that had been sitting in the cupboard for months, the pre-storage treatment was WD-40/RP-7/CRC .

The poor rifle would be gummed up tight as a

That wasn’t too bad, you could normally free up the action with a good soak in turps or diesel.

The real worry was Greek or Italian blokes who had LIBERALLY applied olive oil!

Once the volatile bits of olive oil have evaporated what you’re left with looks and behaves like epoxy!!

I had to boil a semi-auto .22 every day for nearly 2 weeks before I could get the thing apart!