The next big thing in Long Range Wireless IOT

Easy to use wireless device for building the IoT. 4 mile range. 5 year battery life. Works with hundreds of sensors and devices, arduino shield planned!

Check it out on Kickstarter!

Hi, looks very interesting.

Please give a more elaborate description here on the forum, including library and/or sw interface links datasheets etc. In the end your customers mixing the whisker with Arduino will probably end up here .. Make it a win win ;)

Thank you.

The claims for this device (4-10 mile range and 5 year battery life for AA batteries, with 100 mW transmit power) seem ridiculous. I suspect there will be some very disappointed backers.

“LoRa” a trademark of HopeRF. Interested experimenters can already buy Arduino-compatible modules here Anarduino and HopeRF Products and test these claims for themselves (note, I have no connection with anarduino.com).

A word of warning. The experience is likely to be frustrating. See the comments and trial Arduino code here GitHub - anthonywebb/RFM92: RFM92W/93W - Arduino Powered Low Power Long Range LoRa Transceiver

No way you would get that range with the omni antenna shown, but if you used something highly directional (scrap Dish Network dishes?) on both ends it's certainly doable. The 5 year life in my mind would be attainable only with very intermittent data bursts, certainly nothing seeing continuous use.

jremington: The claims for this device (4-10 mile range and 5 year battery life for AA batteries, with 100 mW transmit power) seem ridiculous

In line of sight applications a LoRa device should @ 50mW and 1000bps with simple 1/4 wave wires get around 150 miles, probably 3 times that at 100bps.

should

Very helpful, thanks.

In line of sight applications a LoRa device should @ 50mW and 1000bps with simple 1/4 wave wires get around 150 miles, probably 3 times that at 100bps.

You are delusional. You would be lucky to get 1.5 miles.

jremington:
Very helpful, thanks.

Yes, I said ‘should’ because I have not actually used 50mW.

To test the LoRa devices (RFM98 in this case), you need some very long line of sight distances for instance ground to a high altitude balloon. With a high altitude balloon sending LoRa at 10mW, 1042bps packets were received at 269km.

The RX antenna in this case was a 5dB omni vertical, the TX a 1/4wire and 50mW is +7dBm over 10mw.

So the distance for 50mW on 1/4wave wires both ends should be 2dB more than 269km (7dB-5dBm) which is 338km or 211miles.

How is this device IoT. It doesn't have any of the normal features associated with IoT, ie it doesn't directly support any Internet protocols as far as can see. It doesn't physically connect to the Internet, or connect via Wifi.

Its just a transceiver with microprocessor and USB interface.

And yes, I'm sure you can broadcast for a million miles if you are in space or a high altitude balloon, but in real word scenarios the range is going to be the same as you get from most other RF devices with comparable power output, and antenna system.

you need some very long line of sight distances for instance ground to a high altitude balloon.

That is even more helpful! Thanks for your insightful contributions. We will all rush right out and buy a balloon.

Does this do anything that synapse modules don't already do? http://www.synapse-wireless.com/snap-components/rf-engine. Been using them for a few years now.

rogerClark: And yes, I'm sure you can broadcast for a million miles if you are in space or a high altitude balloon, but in real word scenarios the range is going to be the same as you get from most other RF devices with comparable power output, and antenna system.

Did you test the LoRa devices for yourself ?

In 'real world' tests I have done across a city, between my shed and my brothers garden in Cardiff, with a standard FSK transmitter (RFM22B) and the LoRa device side by side, with the same RX and TX antennas, the LoRa device shows a 20dB signal gain.

The distance 'most other RF devices' need to use 100mW to cover, the LoRa device needed only 1mW, at the same data rate, so LoRa devices should go 10 times further on the same power.

These LoRa devices operate at -10db below noise level (1000bps) and at -20db below noise (100bps) so its no surprise the performance is far in excess of standard FSK devices such as the RFM22B.

alka: Does this do anything that synapse modules don't already do? http://www.synapse-wireless.com/snap-components/rf-engine. Been using them for a few years now.

Those modules appear to have a quoted sensitivity of -101dBm.

The FSK RFM22B has a quoted sensitivty of -121dBm

The LoRa devices have a quoted sensitivity of -148dBm

(100bps) so its no surprise the performance is far in excess of standard FSK devices

. Very impressive data rate! That is indeed high performance.

Glad you agree, they do have an impressive performance.

The LoRa devices will go a bit lower than 100bps, and that could well be eough for some signaling and control applications. At such a low data rates you could expect to get a range of around 30 times what FSK devices like the RFM22B are capable of.

They will also go up to 37,500bps, but only expect around 10 times the range of old style FSK devices at this data rate.