To become an "expert" with electronics...

I kinda get the feeling you need at least 15 years experience to become an expert or....

Spend 30 years doing it only half arsed lol....

Or, a couple years in college, couple years designing in the real world reading spec sheets, understanding & applying them, with indepth peer review to ensure good design practices are followed.

Spend 30 years doing it only half arsed

You can spend 60 years doing it half arsed and you will only ever be an half arsed expert.

Grumpy_Mike:

Spend 30 years doing it only half arsed

You can spend 60 years doing it half arsed and you will only ever be an half arsed expert.

Your logic is incorrect.

If you spend twice as long spending 50% the effort as someone spending 15 years putting 100% effort into it...

Then after 30 years you'll still be an expert....

Whilst things may be different in electronics, in my field of work I have become ever so slightly averse to (some) people with many years of "experience".

It seems you can spend a lifetime doing things, and still be doing them wrong.

The question is, do you have 30 years' experience, or the same year, 30 times?

:)

Your logic is incorrect.

No is not. Knowlage and insight is not a linear thing. Following your logic I can become a martial arts expert by simply attending a beginners class for long enough.

Nope, because who in their right mind would spend 30 years learning the same material over and over?..

Your logic only works if the person is mentally ill.

You could spend a lot of time just trying to keep up with new developments too.

Once you reach your limits, experience is no big help except to keep you from losing your edge.

It does help you absorb new things quicker. I had never done C++ programming before starting Arduino (and some would say I still don't ;) ) but yet I've managed to program way more complicated things then I'd done previously when I was only doing hardware design.

@cjdelphi most parameters in real life cannot be interchanged like you do in your first order approximation.

A simple question (and yes extreme example):

if one sail boot crosses the Atlantic in 12 days, how long do 6 sail boats need (given identical boats wind etc)...

cjdelphi: Nope, because who in their right mind would spend 30 years learning the same material over and over?...

Some people are incapable of learning past a certain level. You of all people should realise this.

The other logic flaw you have is that the body of knowledge in electronics is not an unchanging thing. It rapidly evolves and so you will never be an expert if you can not learn faster than new stuff is invented.

cjdelphi: Nope, because who in their right mind would spend 30 years learning the same material over and over?...

No, it suggests the person learned enough to get their job, and then sat back and kept using that information without making an effort to learn more. You don't actively "learn the same thing" you just don't learn different things. Thus, each year you do the same thing, getting the same experience.

To compare it to snooker for example: if you play the game day in day out, you WILL get better at it. If you play the actual same game, it'll just get easier (skill). However, only by changing parameters (different queues, opponents, lighting, humidity, etc.) of the game you will get better and more flexible with unexpected events (experience). Does that make sense?

Well experience helps in electronics as in many other things. The 'natural talent' that I seemed blessed with was good troubleshooting instincts which when coupled with education and experience blessed me with a very satisfying and rewarding career in customer field service. I did a lot of my early work at customer locations with lots of travel time and freedom of work decisions compared to a lot of other careers.

Lefty

You grow and learn with the whole field growing around you. Then generally people tend to specialize more and more. My physics teacher got out of electrical engineering into teaching when he saw the writing on the wall. Mr. McKee really knew his stuff!

As the field has grown, the software and hardware has grown. I remember when I gave up on assembler because my high level programming work didn't leave me time to keep up with the changes. I didn't have time to devote on a moving target that my compilers were getting better and better at handling for me, and then IDE's (it's been a chunk of forever since I wrote a make file, would have to learn all that again). Accessibility is up, Code::Blocks is free as are other environments I could only dream of before 1985. The hardware in the field has grown even if people still use 8051's and 555's. More and more integration, drivers, decoders, sensors, and it all keeps getting more hardened and easier to build but just count the number of new MCU's! The Due has an ARM that kicks butt on the PC's we had before Pentiums. That's for an MCU. That's the change in what, 20 years?

I think that the logical training to do math from algebra on helped me on all technical subjects.

Also, you'll likely not be as bright after 30 as before 26 as before 24. We peak mentally and it's all downhill from there, but like the muscles with exercise an active brain will maintain better than a lax one.

But while you stay active you do cover ground and there is the occasional serendipitous find that the younger you had not chanced across so yeah, you might not grow as fast as you once did but still you grow. And this is where the field comes in. Which grew more? What people do is specialize into smaller fields that don't grow as fast. Then you become a manager. When you can't do the actual work, you direct.

I've just picked up an old project after quite a while away from arduinos.

First thing that happens is that the latest version of the software isn't compatible with my old project (changes to the wire library) and I suddenly remember how utterly unfamiliar I am with electronics.

Read the software release notes for 1.0, 1.0.1?, making changes for wire where pretty straightforward.

CrossRoads: Read the software release notes for 1.0, 1.0.1?, making changes for wire where pretty straightforward.

I'll give it a go, but I suspect I didn't understand the code when I borrowed it from somewhere else when I started the project the years ago.