Torque problem

If anyone could help me calculate the torque for this problem, it would be great.

Great mix of metric and imperial so I'll use imperial

force = 100 lbf radius = 6.5 cm = 2.559" = .2133 ft so torque = force X radius = 100 X .2133 = 21.33 lbf ft

Is this what you want?

Yes, I was mostly confused by the unit of force, I wasn't sure if I had to find a constant like in Hooke's Law or if I could just use the pound-force. Also, is that final torque answer in foot-pounds or pound-force?

Dimension of torque is force X length so that answer is pound foot. A frequently used convention is to use lbft for torque and ftlb for energy so I used lbft. Another frequently used convention is to use lbf for pounds force just so you won't get it mixed up with pounds weight.

I'm afraid it gets confusing but this is because the imperial system came into use before people fully understood the difference between force, weight and mass (slugs) and we simply try to make the best of a bad situation.

Perfect, thank you very much for your help.

dinel: If anyone could help me calculate the torque for this problem, it would be great.

The question is completely ambiguous, clearly not set by someone knowledgable in mechanics!