TPIC6B595 & 4" 7 Segment Wiring

Hello All,
After my previous post:

I settled on a large 4" 7 segment LED display and a TCIP6B595 shift register. The 4" 7 segment is from Mouser, item# 604-SA40-19SRWA:
http://www.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Kingbright/SA40-19SRWA/?qs=sGAEpiMZZMvkC18yXH9iIgvC7dgeX7B5qyPvXmLVnlY%3D

I’ve got everything functioning, the code works, and I’m ready to etch by PCBs. Before I go ahead, I thought I’d post my schematic here and see if the collective experience here notices anything that I’m obviously doing wrong.

Here’s the wiring schematic:

Well yes, since you asked. A 12V power source is generally shown with polarity marked. Your 12V source has both leads going to (+) pins which as I am sure you can imagine , begs the question " since when do 12V power sources have two “+” leads. I’m sure you have an explanation but whatever it is , if you submitted that schematic to an engineer in a company he would reject it and ask you to label the + and - terminals of the battery (or power supply) and if possible explain why both leads go to + pins.
Also, engineers prefer to see the GND symbol at the bottom of the schematic , not at the top. The convention is + power (Vcc) at the top of the page and - (GND) at the bottom. Is there a reason why you din’t number the pins of the display and the chip. This information is on the datasheets. The arduino doesn’t need it because it’s silkscreened on the PCB. If you want us to be really picky
I (personally) would object to labeling the arduino connections as “pins” because everyone who knows anything about it knows that the I/O names D1,D2,D3 etc are not the same as the ATMega328 chip pin numbers and these days , many people prefer to buy just the chip for $5 and breadboard it or mount it with a socket in a RadioShack pcb rather than spend $30 for an UNO. If you want to avoid confusion you can use the generic d1, d2 or D1 ,D2 (short for "Digital Pins. If you used analog pins they would be A0,A1 etc.

A 12V power source is generally shown with polarity marked. Your 12V source has both leads going to (+) pins which as I am sure you can imagine , begs the question " since when do 12V power sources have two "+" leads. I'm sure you have an explanation but whatever it is , if you submitted that schematic to an engineer in a company he would reject it and ask you to label the + and - terminals of the battery (or power supply) and if possible explain why both leads go to + pins.

Sorry for my wanting notation, my background is in programming, not electrical engineering.
I was trying to show the 12V going to the two Common Cathode connections on the 7 segment LED, not that the 7 segment was providing the power.
This quick schematic was trying indicate how I've got it wired up, so that people could catch any big mistakes I'm making. I'll be screen printing & etching the boards myself, so they'll be no engineer to confuse - I'll just be confusing myself.
As I mentioned, it appears to be running fine, but I'm worried that when I run it for days upon days, there might be a problem (overheating?) that crops up that I'm not seeing now when I run it for 15 minutes at a time.

Thanks for the clarifications.

So which of the 12V wires coming from the 12V power source is the GND ?