Transistor array to go between 5v and load?

I'm trying to drive nine pins with my mega, but they can't quite source enough current. I thought a transistor array would do the trick, but the transistors need to be between 5V source and the load. The commonly used ULN2803A has a common ground and needs to go betwen the load and ground. I need an array with common Vcc.

The loads I'm working with have a common ground. Just picture nine LED's with their ground pins tied together. This is a legacy piece of equipment, so can't be altered.

Does anyone know of a transistor array that can do this, or will I need to use a bunch of single transistors.

what about ULN-2082A ?

In days past I would have used a UDN2981 in DIP package. Unfortunately they are obsolete now, but you might find some end-of-line stock somewhere.

Allegro Micro do manufacture the A2982 but only in surface mount 20-pin SOIC.

Thanks for the tips, while the IC’s you reference are not easily available, it led me to realize that I was looking for a “source driver”. A little more searching and I found these two options in DIP packages:

MIC2981/82YN
This seems about perfect. with 500mA per pin and only $1 at Verical. Says it works with 5V TTL, I wonder if it works with 3.3v?

TLC59213IN
I think this would work too. It has CLK and CLR pins which might be useful in some applications. About the same price. I’m not exactly sure why the Peak current is negative (-500mA). It looks like this would work with 3.3v inputs.

Thanks for pointing me in the right direction!

TLC59213IN needs a 5V supply to the IC... but it does look like 3V logic will drive the input pins correctly.

It says -500mA because it is a high side driver. The typical open collector low side switch is a low side driver, sinking current. This one sources it, so I suppose they call it a negative because of that difference.

Current doesn't really have a polarity, it has a direction. But we don't really have a symbol for direction.

polymorph: It says -500mA because it is a high side driver. The typical open collector low side switch is a low side driver, sinking current. This one sources it, so I suppose they call it a negative because of that difference.

current is measured flowing into the driver, so is negative - you'll see this convention on datasheets for PNP and p-channel transistors, the origin being, as far as I can deduce, that the basic transistor variables are Ice and Ids (current from collector to emitter, current from drain to source). The sign is a useful double check that you are looking at the correct polarity of device.

Current doesn't really have a polarity, it has a direction. But we don't really have a symbol for direction.

Don't get this distinction, a measured voltage or current always has a sign, and this depends on which way round you connect the meter. The measurement is meaningless without the information about how the meter was connected. The convention with voltage is usually that meter's black lead goes to ground, so we don't usually have to clarify how the meter was connected.

TD62783 are pin for pin and electric compatible with UDN 2981, and cheaper what I can see.

Pelle