Trying to produce high voltage AC - how?

Hi all,

I'm looking at using two LT1082 (datasheet: https://www.analog.com/media/en/technical-documentation/data-sheets/1082fas.pdf) to generate a +50V and -50V signal and then use transistors to control this with the Arduino with an inverter logic gate. I need about 20 mA.

I don't know much about logic gates. I believe the gist of an inverter is that when the Arduino runs low, the logic gate runs high. So if I'm using 50% PWM, the BJT coupled to the Arduino (+50V) runs high when Arduino is high, and the BJT coupled to the inverter (-50V) runs high when Arduino runs low, producing square wave AC.

If this is correct, I have three major questions:
How do I set the voltage on the LT1082? I can't tell from the data sheet.
How do I choose an inverter?
I'm going to use an NPN BJT for the positive voltage; do I need a PNP BJT for the negative voltage because of the different sign, or do I just hook the NPN up backwards?

Thanks for your help.

There are no common gates, or inverters to levels like 50 volt as faar as I know.
Controlling what using transistors? How?
Do You want a +/- 50 volt square wave signal?
What will this AC be used to?`

Is 48V okay ? There are DC/DC-converters to make 48V phantom power for condenser microphones. With two isolated converters it is easy to make -48V and +48V.

The output voltage is regulated with the FB (Feedback) pin which has the reference voltage of 1.244V.
The manufacturer's page: https://www.analog.com/en/products/lt1082.html.
There is no Application Note how to use the FB pin for a boost circuit.

This is a common way to use the LT1082: https://www.arrow.com/en/reference-designs/typical-application-circuit-for-lt1082-1a-high-voltage-efficiency-switching-boost-converter/d680952dcd5dab97efc3f14269a1a0f1.

What frequency range should the output be ?

Wow, perfect example of the x-y problem

Please, let’s forget about the LT1082’s and discuss what you need the +/-50 volts for. Why? Well, based on your questions, you’ve got about zero chance of making a switching regulator actually function. Yup, sorry to be brutally honest but that’s a fact. If you don’t know what controls the voltage of a switching regulator, you’re sure as heck aren’t going to put one on a breadboard and have it do anything other than than let the smoke out. And, IIRC, those chips are about $7 a piece.

You can buy some complete boost regulator modules on eBay or elsewhere that will probably work but you’ll need two supplies to start with but - there may be easier and better ways to get to a usable solution but it all depends- on what you’ll actually trying to achieve.

So, it would a far more productive conversation to discuss what the end goal is rather than a switching regulator ic. Just sayin.

Also it's difficult to provide specific advice without seeing a complete, accurate schematic.

Koepel:
Is 48V okay ? There are DC/DC-converters to make 48V phantom power for condenser microphones. With two isolated converters it is easy to make -48V and +48V.

Phantom power is high impedance and only a few microAmps.