TSR 1 series DC/DC converters for use in a car?

I’ve been searching for quite a while for a simple solution for powering an Arduino in an automotive application and came across this product on adafruits website.

http://www.adafruit.com/datasheets/tsr1.pdf

Could the 2433 or 2450 units(I have some 5V trinkets I’m planning to use) be used to directly filter/step down 12-15V power from my cigarette lighter(or other accessory circuit) down to 3.3/5V for the Arduino? I know car power systems can be very noisy. I just don’t want to melt anything.

Thanks, Rob

Yes, the TSR 1 series should work, and not cause anything to melt. Automobiles have a reputation for noisy power, but that does not normally mean any melt downs.

I would suggest use a few extra capacitors in an automotive environment tho for stability. And take your power right off the battery, not of the Frame.

If your application(s) act erratic, then you may want to be concerned about noise on the power, but if not, you are home free.

Info on automotive power issues

Having a regulator alone is often not recommended due to the maximum operating range still being below the highest of voltage spikes.

But some regulators shut down to avoid damage if that range is exceeded.

[quote author=jack wp link=msg=2389260 date=1441743545] Yes, the TSR 1 series should work, and not cause anything to melt. Automobiles have a reputation for noisy power, but that does not normally mean any melt downs.

I would suggest use a few extra capacitors in an automotive environment tho for stability. And take your power right off the battery, not of the Frame.

If your application(s) act erratic, then you may want to be concerned about noise on the power, but if not, you are home free.

[/quote]

I guess I’d set it up with 2 capacitors and an inductor like on sheet 3 of the data sheet I linked above?

ApexM0Eng: Info on automotive power issues

Having a regulator alone is often not recommended due to the maximum operating range still being below the highest of voltage spikes.

But some regulators shut down to avoid damage if that range is exceeded.

Thanks! I'll look into that tonight!

Yes, if you disconnect your battery while the alternator is running at high rpm, and a load dump of 120 volts occurs, that could cause a problem, not just to your arduino, but thousands of dollars worth of other equipment in your auto. So, DONT do that, and connect your system directly to the battery.

Don't get a jump from someone using a 24 volt battery system to jump your 12 volt car. And watch and make sure they don't reverse the wires.

Oh, and don't drive through a railroad crossing if the gates are down.

Just kidding about the railroad crossing.