Ultrasonic pressure sensing

Hello,

I am trying to create an ultrasound based pressure sensor following this paper. The paper prescribes a using two ultrasonic shear wave transducers. Do suggest any off the shelf shear wave ultrasonic transducers that can be used with Arduino.

sensors-15-08253 (1).pdf (1.22 MB)

Let's turn this around, as this is not a "do my homework for me, for free" forum, and at the very least you could ask politely instead of using the commanding voice.

So, feel free to suggest any off the shelf shear wave ultrasonic transducers that can be used for your specific application.

Then if you can explain in detail what you expect the Arduino to do with them (switch them on/off? control frequency? take readings? if so, what readings do you want to take?) there's a good chance we'll be happy to have a look at it and suggest whether that can be done or not with an Arduino, and/or what it takes to make it work.

As you know, liquids do not support shear wave propagation, and the author of the paper does not seem to identify the transducers used, so you are on your own.

This will take some very sophisticated equipment: fast, high voltage piezo drivers, high speed ADCs, fast processors, etc. Not an Arduino project.

jremington:
As you know, liquids do not support shear wave propagation, and the author of the paper does not seem to identify the transducers used, so you are on your own.

This will take some very sophisticated equipment: fast, high voltage piezo drivers, high speed ADCs, fast processors, etc. Not an Arduino project.

Thanks for the opinion. It saved me from pursuing something beyond what’s possible.

Edit: Forgot to mention, transverse waves propagate longitudinally in liquids and transverse in solids. That’s the principle the measurement is based on.

wvmarle:
Let's turn this around, as this is not a "do my homework for me, for free" forum, and at the very least you could ask politely instead of using the commanding voice.

So, feel free to suggest any off the shelf shear wave ultrasonic transducers that can be used for your specific application.

Then if you can explain in detail what you expect the Arduino to do with them (switch them on/off? control frequency? take readings? if so, what readings do you want to take?) there's a good chance we'll be happy to have a look at it and suggest whether that can be done or not with an Arduino, and/or what it takes to make it work.

Mr. Marle, you seem to be a helpful person around these forums. So, kindly, let me explain.

I'm a mechanical engineer by training and profession with some exposure to electrical/electronic side of things and quite a newbie to application of arduino to engineering projects. So, as I was investigating water pressure sensing application, I came across this paper(which I shared here). After browsing around the forums, I decided to see if the more experienced folk here can shed any further light on it but suggesting any off the shelf shear sensors they know of, that can be tested around with. And I shared the paper as a reference, with a title denoting the topic. That's exactly how any engineer communicates with a fellow engineer, to the point.

You, in the course of helping several people seem to have missed this gist my two sentences, to the point of interpreting that I'm asking you to do my home work, in a "commanding voice", no less. So, to clarify: no, I'm not "commanding" you to do my "home work", Mr. Marle.

Hope this helps.

Well, can't help you with sensor suggestions as for starters I have no idea what this "shear wave" even is. But that's not the problem at hand.

I do know a little about electronics and interfacing, so as said if you can come up with a sensor that can measure whatever it is you want to measure, I'd be happy to take a very hard look at its datasheet to figure out its interface, and how to make it work with an Arduino or like microcontroller - assuming this is possible, of course. Most sensors have one of a number of generic interfaces which can be read by generic microcontrollers such as the Arduino.

transverse waves propagate longitudinally in liquids and transverse in solids.

I think of the method as taking advantage of an extremely inefficient process that converts the transverse motion of the solid (S waves) at the solid-liquid interface into longitudinal compression waves (P waves) propagating through the liquid.

Because of that inefficiency, high power transducers are required, which adds to the difficulty. It should be possible to use P wave transducers, with much greater efficiency.

More here on wave conversion: Converted-wave analysis - Wikipedia