Updating from 1.8.12 to 18.13 Detailed description how to keep boards and libs

Hello,

I don't want to start collecting Arduini-IDE-versions. By installing every new IDE-version as some kind of portable version.

So does there exist a detailed description to do the following:

I have installed additional boards like ESP8266, ESP32 etc. I have installed quite a lot of additional libraries.
Now I would like to move on from IDE-Version 1.18.12 to 1.8.13 and keep all boards and libraries.
Without the need to install them new.

The standard process of installing a new version by using the windows-installer deletes the old version and then installs the new one.
Some postings recomend install as "portable" and the pre-installed boards/liberaries are still accessable.

Is updating in the sense of overwrite files that are updated and keep all others possible at all?

So if there exists a tutorial "how to update to a newer IDE with keeping all board and libs please post a link.

best regards Stefan

StefanL38:
The standard process of installing a new version by using the windows-installer deletes the old version and then installs the new one.

It only deletes the Arduino IDE installation folder. It won't touch any of your other folders. This is why you should never install anything to the Arduino IDE installation folder. If you have used the Arduino IDE to install your boards platforms and library or followed the correct procedure and installed them manually to your sketchbook folder, then there will be no problem at all. If you have put some things in the arduino IDE installation folder, then you need to remove them before updating the IDE, and put them in the correct location this time.

StefanL38:
Some postings recomend install as "portable" and the pre-installed boards/liberaries are still accessable.

There are valid reasons for using the IDE's portable mode, but this is not one of them. Having the IDE in portable mode won't provide any benefits at all for what you want to do. In fact, the portable mode is the one time when you might install things into the Arduino IDE installation folder. The reason is that when you put it in portable mode, the IDE is configured to be self-contained, with all your boards and libraries and sketches and the IDE installed under one folder. So you definitely need to be careful to remove all that from the portable subfolder you created before updating the IDE. However, if you're not using portable mode, then that's not a consideration.

StefanL38:
Is updating in the sense of overwrite files that are updated and keep all others possible at all?

So if there exists a tutorial "how to update to a newer IDE with keeping all board and libs please post a link.

No need for one. Just do the install. Millions of people have done this. If they all lost their important files, the forum would be full of that. But it's not.

However, you should always be sure to back up your important files. It's not necessary to do that with the libraries and boards platforms you install though, because if something bad like a hard drive crash happened, you can always just install them again. It's the files you've written yourself or modified that you need to be careful to preserve.

Hi pert,

thank you very much for answering. I think I understand now how it works.

best regards Stefan

You're welcome. I'm glad if I was able to be of assistance. Enjoy!
Per

pert:
There are valid reasons for using the IDE’s portable mode, but this is not one of them. Having the IDE in portable mode won’t provide any benefits at all for what you want to do. In fact, the portable mode is the one time when you might install things into the Arduino IDE installation folder. The reason is that when you put it in portable mode, the IDE is configured to be self-contained, with all your boards and libraries and sketches and the IDE installed under one folder. So you definitely need to be careful to remove all that from the portable subfolder you created before updating the IDE. However, if you’re not using portable mode, then that’s not a consideration.

Can I get some clarification on this please? I thought that using Portable would put everything you added - boards, libraries, whatever - into the Portable folder. And to upgrade to a new version of the IDE, you would simply download and unzip the new version into its own folder, then copy over the entire Portable folder. So you would not have to reinstall anything. Is that not the case? I’ve been trying to figure out what benefit you get from installing the IDE versus using the portable method, and haven’t come up with one. But perhaps my understanding of how portable works is wrong. I’m still on my original 1.8.8 portable, so probably need to understand this sometime soon.

ShermanP:
I thought that using Portable would put everything you added - boards, libraries, whatever - into the Portable folder.

Boards, yes. Libraries are installed to the libraries subfolder of your sketchbook folder. The default locaiton of the sketchbook folder is in the portable folder. So if you use the default configuration, this is also true for libraries. However, you can customize the sketchbook location via File > Preferences. So if you set it to a location outside the portable folder, then it will not be true.

ShermanP:
And to upgrade to a new version of the IDE, you would simply download and unzip the new version into its own folder, then copy over the entire Portable folder. So you would not have to reinstall anything. Is that not the case?

That is correct. However, if you weren't using portable mode, you wouldn't even need to do that "copy over" procedure. So this is not a valid reason for using portable mode.

ShermanP:
I've been trying to figure out what benefit you get from installing the IDE versus using the portable method, and haven't come up with one.

The advantages of not using portable mode:

  • Portable mode is impossible (or at least extremely difficult) on macOS
  • Portable mode is extremely difficult when using the Microsoft Store version of the IDE
  • Portable mode can not be used when the IDE is installed to the default location on Windows
  • No need to worry about losing files when updating the IDE
  • Uses the standard convention of separating data files and extensions from the application installation

The advantages of using portable mode:

  • Portable installations, such as on a USB thumb drive
  • Complete, self contained packages of everything you need for a specific project
  • Sandboxing multiple IDE installations from each other
  • Multi-user environments (e.g., schools), where the user-specific standard data folder location is problematic

Thanks very much for the explanation. I'm on Windows, and I think I will stick with the portable version. Perhaps I'm remembering it wrong, or perhaps they all related to Mac, but it seems I've seen in this subforum a lot of examples of things just not working right, particularly on upgrade, involving the installed version, and very little involving the portable version.

ShermanP:
I've seen in this subforum a lot of examples of things just not working right, particularly on upgrade, involving the installed version, and very little involving the portable version.

Keep in mind that only 0.001% of users are using the IDE in portable mode, so it's statistically inevitable that you'll see less reports of people having problems when using the IDE in portable mode.

The primary reason portable mode might be helpful to fix an error is if you have some bad files in the normal data or sketchbook folders. Switching to portable mode gives you a fresh start. But the same could be done by simply deleting those folders and the same problem would occur if the bad files were in the portable installation.