Uploading grbl to Arduino, "stk500_recv()" error times out after 10 attempts

Using my late 2011 MacBook Pro. Onto my second arduino (first one didn't show up in coms).

I've done a lot of googling, but with no results. Most of the suggestions say I probably have the wrong port or board selected.

Port I have selected shows up as:
/dev/cu.usbmodemFA131(Arduino/Genuino Uno)
Only other port is a bluetooth option, so that's not it.

Board I have selected:
Arduino/Genuino Uno
I tried every board option and none of them worked.

This is the arduino I am using:

The green light is on, and there's also a yellow light that goes on and off that has an "L" label, near pin 13.

I also downloaded updated FDMI drivers. What could I be doing wrong? Any help is appreciated.

Thanks,
Sam

Disconnect the Arduino. Check in IDE which ports are shown.
Connect the Arduino. Check in IDE which ports are shown; it should show a new one and that's the one that you need to select.

If there is no new port, you will need to start digging in the system. I'm not using a Mac; it should be the equivalent of Windows Device Manager (possibly lsusb and dmesg commands).

Other thing to checkis if the cable is inserted properly and to try another cable (though the original that comes with the product should have been checked by the supplier).

There is no need to install FTDI drivers as the board has the original 16U2 usb-to-ttl converter.

FYI:
The blinking LED indicates that the default blink sketch is loaded. When you connect the board, it should first flash 3 times (or so) in quick succession before you get to the blinking pattern. Does it indeed flash in quick succession? If not, no boot loader is installed on the board.

After disconnecting and reconnecting, the new port shows and that’s the one I’m selecting.

USB-B to USB-A cable is the one that came with it.

As far as the blinking light, it actually doesn’t blink. I plug it in, the green light on “on” is solid, and the yellow light on “L” is also solid and not blinking. What do I need to do install a boot loader on the board? Is it part of the arduino software, or do I need to find something online? (Recommendations?) I’m searching now.

Thanks,
Sam

If you are getting a new port after plugging the board in, that means the USB cable is good.

I do think the next step is burning the bootloader. You will need an ISP programmer for this. If you don't have a dedicated ISP programmer, you can use a spare Arduino board as an "Arduino as ISP":

I do not have another working Arduino, so I'm assuming I can't use one for the "Arduino as ISP" option.

Can someone give me some advice for steps on burning a bootloader? I'm newer to the programming side of things so need some help there.

Thanks,
Sam

krohlows:
The green light is on, and there's also a yellow light that goes on and off that has an "L" label, near pin 13.

krohlows:
As far as the blinking light, it actually doesn't blink. I plug it in, the green light on "on" is solid, and the yellow light on "L" is also solid and not blinking.

You are contradicting yourself.

Any chance that you have the board laying on protective foam or on the plastic back that it came in; might be the cause of the problem as both can be conductive. However, it would probably not show up as a board in the IDE if that is the case.

krohlows:
I do not have another working Arduino, so I'm assuming I can't use one for the "Arduino as ISP" option.

Can someone give me some advice for steps on burning a bootloader? I'm newer to the programming side of things so need some help there.

You can't. You will need a programmer for that.

You might want to ship it back and ask for a refund / replacement. Or buy another one; although no guarantee, I would buy an original (they usually ( :wink: ) work) for now till you're more familiar with everything.

First step is to get an ISP programmer. You can’t burn the bootloader without one. If you don’t have a programmer or an Arduino, you’ll need to buy one or the other. Since there is a possibility that your Uno is cooked, you are probably best off buying an Arduino. It’s always a good idea to have a spare one on hand. Also, make sure to buy some jumper wires of the correct gender and a 10 uF capacitor (or better yet a handful of them). You can probably get away without the capacitor, but in some cases it is necessary.

If you prefer to buy a dedicated ISP programmer, I recommend the 6 pin USBasp, which you can buy for <$3 USD w/ free shipping from China on eBay:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/362773069680

Although the tutorial I posted a link to in my previous reply is for the Arduino as ISP, it also serves as a general tutorial for burning the bootloader using the Arduino IDE. If necessary, I can provide more specific instructions once you have an ISP programmer to work with.

Sorry for contradicting my blinking light statement. The first Arduino I tried (a china one I got free from an online offer) had the blinking light, but the port wouldn't recognize. The second one I got is the one I linked above, and it just has the solid yellow light and the port is recognized.

I have male to male jumpers I could use, but I'm not familiar with what I would need to do with them or capacitors to resolve this issue.

Probably going to try buying a legit arduino and that isp programmer. I've been chasing these issues for too long and need them to be resolved.

Thanks for the help. Anything else I can do to fix this?

Thanks,
Sam

krohlows:
I have male to male jumpers I could use, but I'm not familiar with what I would need to do with them or capacitors to resolve this issue.

Well, without another Arduino board there is nothing you can do with them. With another Arduino board, you would just follow the tutorial I linked. If you had any problems or questions along the way, I am happy to help, but there is no point in moving forward with that until you have the hardware you need on hand.

krohlows:
Anything else I can do to fix this?

You've gone through all the possibilities I can think of short of burning the bootloader (which I always put off as the last resort because it's fairly complex and requires hardware that not everyone has on hand). Maybe someone else here will have another idea.

The chinese clone doesn't recognize as a port because it has a different serial chip (the clones almost all use a different serial adapter than the official ones - on the downside, it can't be reprogrammed with UnoJoy et. al. to act as a different sort of USB device, but hardly anyone does that; on the upside, the serial adapter used in the genuine boards is much easier to damage by abusing electrically), and you haven't installed drivers for that - check the markings on the black chip near the USB port - it'll probably be either a CP2102 or CH340G - whichever one it is, google that part number, your operating system, and the version of your operating system (particularly important on MacOS - a few versions back Apple broke the driver for macos that previously worked, then the next version of macos, and a different driver was needed. They may have done it again in the next version of MacOS too).

L LED stuck on usually means that the serial adapter and the opamp used for power supply switching and buffering the L LED are trashed (this is the usual result of the aforementioned electrical abuse). (if you connect a jumper to ground, hold down reset, and with reset held down, touch the other end of the jumper to arduino pin 13, if the board is good, the L LED will turn off. Disconnect the jumper before releasing reset)

I did the ground, reset, to 13 thing and the LED turned off. Although, I did notice that the LED turns on and off based on how the USB-B port is flexed, so that’s not a good sign…

I ordered a genuine arduino and an ISP programmer, so hopefully one of these fix the problem.

Thanks,
Sam