Use a seperate regulator or the one included in the motor driver?

Some motor driver chip have a regulator included with them. Are these robust to use if I want to power my microcontroller from the same power supply as my motor? Or is it safer to have a separate regulator so I have more control over the noise?

For instance?

Paul

Paul_KD7HB:
For instance?

Paul

I meant it as a general question, but maybe it’s too broad. I found a couple of motor driver
boards with L298N and a 5V regulator as well as boards with L293 and 7085 regulator.
There is also the DRV8850 which includes a LDO regulator.

Data sheet -> https://www.ti.com/lit/ds/symlink/drv8850.pdf?ts=1588252512815

if no analog measurements are made, you can do it. Look at the output current (approx. 250mA) from the control and the temperature of the driver.

nembedded:
I meant it as a general question, but maybe it's too broad. I found a couple of motor driver
boards with L298N and a 5V regulator as well as boards with L293 and 7085 regulator.
There is also the DRV8850 which includes a LDO regulator.

The electronics on the motor controller boards likely need to have 5 volts for proper operation and that is where they get it.

Paul

General questions are only answerable with "yes", "no", or more often "sometimes", "maybe", "it depends".

Specific questions may be answered by the datasheet - although noise specs for a built-in regulator in
a motor driver are unlikely to be given as motor drivers are immensely noisy when driving a motor due to the
heavy switching currents.

So if noise matters, use a separate regulator is probably a good idea. And if noise matters you probably want to
be opto-isolated from any motor driver circuitry anyway.