Use arduino to control treadmill motor

Hi guys,

Just wonder our treadmill broke but one of the electricians tested the motor by hardwiring it to the mains and the motor runs fine.

Is it possible to control that motor using arduino? It’s a 160 Volt and 6 Amps and it’s a magnetic motor.

Short answer YES !

How you do it though has a few differing options.

A PWM pin on the Arduino may be the best bet to control an external device capable of handling the motor voltage and current but with enough extra capacity to spare for initial startup surges.

Normally at higher voltage you would need a TRIAC type circuit.
Are you sure your mains voltage is 160V as that seems rather odd.

Also we would need the exact motor specs or a link to it please.

Yeah I’m trying to look for the motor online I found different types of the same brand but can’t find the exact model

That’s the picture of the actual motor

Can you post the pic in here please.

See second link below for help with that.

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Tomstud122:
Hi guys,

Just wonder our treadmill broke but one of the electricians tested the motor by hardwiring it to the mains and the motor runs fine.

Is it possible to control that motor using arduino? It’s a 160 Volt and 6 Amps and it’s a magnetic motor.

Well it would be very suprizing indeed if it wasn't a magnetic motor... Electrostatic and piezoelectric motors
do exist, but they are very exotic and not found in treadmills.

The problem is that there many types of standard (electromagnetic) motor... induction, universal, PMDC,
series-would DC, shunt-wound DC, stepper, synchronous, etc etc.

But that photo of the motor's ID plate identifies it as PMDC. These are relatively simple and straightforward.

Just wonder our treadmill broke but one of the electricians tested the motor by hardwiring it to the mains and the motor runs fine.

Connecting a DC motor to AC mains is a bad idea, I suspect you misunderstood what was done. Doing that
could damage the motor, demagnetize it, and won't make it turn...

So you need a DC power supply and DC motor controller. If you want full speed you'll need the full 160V which is not likely to be very cheap. And of course these are lethal voltages, and high power DC has the
issue of needing special switchgear than can handle it - if you want an emergency stop switch it should
be on the input to the power supply, not between the DC supply and motor as most emergency stop switches aren't DC rated above 24V and could fail to break the DC circuit, burning themselves up in
process, ie starting a fire but not stopping the motor.