Using 8 buttons as Keyboard

Hi,
I am new to Arduino .
I actually need to design a hand-glove with eight keys. and transfer ASCII values to the hyper terminal of the PC . I got succeeded in by using ATMega32 AVR MCU.
Here is the video of my simulation result

But now i am planning to implement it using Arduino Lilypad.I even bought it and started with smaller tutorials.
But here instead of using PORTS , PINS are being used , right here i am getting confused how to start.
Because in ATMega32 i used PORTD to connect the eight inputs. and wrote the the code ti monitor the pins of PORTD and provided few delay with FOR LOOP and used Bitwise OR to add the key pressed button.the code was like this.

int main (void)
{
    unsigned int z,a,f,i;
    DDRB=0x00;
    while(1)
{
   while(PINB==0x00);
   z=PINB;
   for(f=0;f<65000;f++)
{
   for(i=0;i<20;i++)
{
   z|=PINB;
}
}
switch(z)
{
   case(0xC0):
{
   a=0xC0;
   usart_init();
   usart_send(a);
   break;
}
   case(0x08):
{
   a=0x08;
   usart_init();
   usart_send(a);
   break;
}
   case(0x20):
{
   a=0x20;
   usart_init();
   usart_send(a);
   break;
}
   case(0x30):
{
   a='0';
   usart_init();
   usart_send(a);
   break;
}

depending on the keys pressed i stored that value in a Variable Z ans using switch case i transferred to the PC.

how to implement it in Arduino language as port or should i use byte operation

you're defining pins , in arduino IDE , which you can download from website , like this
int pin1 = 0;
and this pin corresponds the physical pin on the microcontroller .
then you have to do same but use HIGH for 1 and LOW for 0 .

for ex : you have input and want to store it to variable z . First of all you have to define pin X and define the pin number :

int pinX = 0; //defined pin it's "address" is 0 in program but not same in microcontroller
..........
if (digitalRead (pinX) == HIGH) { // do something
       z = 1; //or whatever you want
 }

You still can use your PORTD if you like. You just might have problems if you’re changing the board (better the MCU). The concept of ports with up to eight bits corresponding to pins is not as easy to understand as that of connector pins on the board numbered through from 0 to 13 (for the digital IO) which a novice can use then by calling something like:

digitalWrite(5, HIGH);
byte button = digitalRead(6);

Something like

PORTD |= 1 << 7;

as you’re probably used to, is still fine in Arduino with the restriction that it’s not as portable (to other boards) as the first one.