Using a motor and PSU , need help with stall current?

I'm looking at a motor with a rated current 25A and stall current at 80A , but my PSU has 30A at 12v , so I'm confused if the motor will run at all or will it run at full speed?

I guess you're not planning on stalling the motor so the only time when it will approach stall current is on startup, particularly if the motor is having to accelerate a heavy load.

You may be able to get away with it (though it's bad design not to cater for a current level you know is possible). Basically it all depends on what load the motor is having to move.

Steve

I actually intend to use it for Force Feedback wheel, the motor barely spins in use but gives resistance , so i kinda thought its almost always on stall , pushing highest torque.

I detect a Chinese power supply. Usual parameters are "either one or the other, but not both" as far as voltage and current specs.

Paul

WatchDoge:
I actually intend to use it for Force Feedback wheel, the motor barely spins in use but gives resistance , so i kinda thought its almost always on stall , pushing highest torque.

I don't know anything about Force Feedback wheels but if you're right then you will need a better power supply.

You can always try it powered with a 12V car battery (which will certainly deliver plenty of current) and measure how much current it's actually taking.

Steve

WatchDoge:
I actually intend to use it for Force Feedback wheel, the motor barely spins in use but gives resistance , so i kinda thought its almost always on stall , pushing highest torque.

A 12V motor on 80 amps of stall will give incredible amounts of resistance, and burst into flames after 30 seconds or so! For force-feedback you’ll be using a current-control PID loop to directly control torque and nothing like so much current will be involved!

A motor rated upto 25A running current will take an amp or more no-load current, your supply can drive it, but if its the sort of supply that trips-out on over current it won’t be able to get it started due to the vast stall current pull if you just connect it directly to the motor terminals.

One solution is to use PWM and ramp it up slowly enough that the motor can speed up before the current exceeds 30A.

However if you want torque control anyway, you can implement a current-control loop and then the current should never be an issue. You need to sense the current at a pretty high sample rate for proper current control as it can build up fast. So you also need a reasonable PWM frequency too, 16kHz is often used if your motor driver can handle it as its ultrasonic (nearly!).

A motor rated at 25A continuous duty can only handle that current with the shaft spinning, as that spins the cooling fan that ventilates the windings. The max continuous stall current rating will be less and determined by the thermal behaviour of the motor.