Using code from other open source projects?

Hi
Is it illegal to use code from other products because open source products give you access to their code online so what's stopping me from using that because at the top of the code it has terms of use so what does that mean?
Thanks :confused:

If it is open source it usually means that you can use it for whatever you want but you have to keep the parts you used from other open source code and any changes you made to that code open source.

Long story short, you can use my code but if you do you have to be willing to share what you do with it with everyone else.

Are you selling a product or using the code in an academia setting?

wfisom:
. . . at the top of the code it has terms of use so what does that mean?
Thanks :confused:

Do the "terms of use" not tell you the terms of use?

https://www.arduino.cc/en/Main/FAQ

MrMark:
Do the "terms of use" not tell you the terms of use?

https://www.arduino.cc/en/Main/FAQ

Yeah,my point is that how can someone own code?

ApexM0Eng:
Are you selling a product or using the code in an academia setting?

my plan is to start selling yeah

Delta_G:
If it is open source it usually means that you can use it for whatever you want but you have to keep the parts you used from other open source code and any changes you made to that code open source.

Long story short, you can use my code but if you do you have to be willing to share what you do with it with everyone else.

Delta_G:
If it is open source it usually means that you can use it for whatever you want but you have to keep the parts you used from other open source code and any changes you made to that code open source.

Long story short, you can use my code but if you do you have to be willing to share what you do with it with everyone else.

ah right ok thanks would it make any different if was to start selling the board with the code in it?

Yes you can sell with an open source licence. But the legality of the issue comes into play if you then tried to withhold your code or make restrictions after using open source material.

ApexM0Eng:
Yes. But the legality of the issue comes into play if you then tried to withhold your code after using open source material.

yeah I would make sure all the code is open source so hopefully that wouldn't be a problem

wfisom:
Yeah,my point is that how can someone own code?

Someone owns code if they wrote it. It is just like any other copyright. Stephen King owns the stories he's written. A newspaper owns the stories it publishes. And I own any original code that I've written.

If I choose to license that under open source terms, it's just like any other license. You have to abide by the terms set forth in that license or you can be sued for breaching it.

Delta_G:
Someone owns code if they wrote it. It is just like any other copyright. Stephen King owns the stories he's written. A newspaper owns the stories it publishes. And I own any original code that I've written.

If I choose to license that under open source terms, it's just like any other license. You have to abide by the terms set forth in that license or you can be sued for breaching it.

but surely there's only one way of writing certain code?

wfisom:
but surely there's only one way of writing certain code?

that's what I don't get

You know how certain jingles are copyrighted, but the words within the song can not be? There is a limit to what can be owned.

If you are declaring a variable in a piece of code there are limited ways of doing so and if you tried to claim that as your own, you wouldn't get very far. You have to have a case to a unique piece of something that is acknowledged as unique. For code, usually this means large pieces of code which could have been done numerous different ways.

When it comes to copyleft (which is not copyright), you agree to a terms of condition. You are bound by that. So if you agree to those terms anything you make with that is also bound by those terms regardless of how much of it is used.

ApexM0Eng:
You know how certain jingles are copyrighted, but the words within the song can not be? There is a limit to what can be owned.

If you are declaring a variable in a piece of code there are limited ways of doing so and if you tried to claim that as your own, you wouldn't get very far. You have to have a case to a unique piece of something that is acknowledged as unique. For code, usually this means large pieces of code which could have been done numerous different ways.

When it comes to copyleft (which is not copyright), you agree to a terms of condition. You are bound by that. So if you agree to those terms anything you make with that is also bound by those terms regardless of how much of it is used.

Right ok I understand that now thanks for explaining that to me appreciate it:)

Berkeley got a lot of flack back when they were first releasing BSD Unix, slapping copyright notices on every piece of source code, include "true" which read something like "int main() { exit(0); }"

More recently, the Google vs Oracle lawsuit apparently hinges on similar complaints.